Category Archives: defense

Xincai Cai MEH defense July 24th Douglas Classroom 10:30am

Name: Xincai Cai

Location: CUH Douglas Research classroom

Time: July 24, 10:30AM

Committee: Kern Ewing, Darlene Zabowski and Jim Fridley

Title: Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Practices

Coal is a very valuable energy source around the world. Most electrical energy comes from coal burning. Since the 1880s, coal production accelerated dramatically. Surface coal mining and underground coal mining are the most common methods to extract coal. In the United States and Australia, surface coal mining is more prevalent than underground coal mining. In China, underground coal mining is more prevalent than surface coal mining. Surface mining is used for extraction when the coal seams are very close to the earth’s surface. All the vegetation, soil and rocks are removed and the coal is extracted from the ground.

The demand for coal has taken priority over environmental concerns. In the past, coal mining operators and governments had little consideration for reclamation after coal mining and coal operators did not have a long –term commitment to the land or incentive to reclaim the land. As a result of that, the environment was heavily impacted by surface coal mining. High-walls were left exposed; topsoil was washed away; landslides formed on unstable hillsides; streams and rivers were polluted by acid mine drainage and large areas were eroded. The huge negative environmental impacts from surface coal mining led to increasing concerns about better coal industry management and policy. Each country has specific regulations about coal mining industry and reclamation practices.

Cai

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Dylan McCalmont thesis defense, July 18th 11:30am AND 22

Thesis title: Diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in soils under managed and native conditions

When and Where: July 18th 11:30am, Anderson 22

Committee: Dr. Sally Brown (chair), Dr. David Stahl, and Dr. Steven Fransen

Abstract:

Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) contribute to a significant portion of ammonia oxidation in soil. These organisms have significant impacts on plant proliferation, as well as production of fugitive gases. AOA community distribution patterns are influenced by multiple factors, of which, biogeography has emerged as an important variable. Developing an understanding of community differences in AOA amid differing land management types may provide tools to understand differences in N use efficiency and other, broader impacts of AOA on soil and atmospheric biogeochemistry. The goal of this study was to assess whether agriculturally managed soils displayed shifts in AOA community diversity in contrast to non-managed soils located in close proximity. Soil was collected from two sites in eastern Washington with similar climate and precipitation patterns. At both sites soil was collected from the surface horizon (0-15 cm) of the adjacent native shrub-steppe (dominated by bunchgrass) and from switchgrass cultivated fields. AOA communities were evaluated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) targeting subunit A of the Archaeal ammonia monooxygenase and analyzed using multivariate statistical approaches. At both the slightly alkalkine and slightly acidic agricultural sites, significant differences in AOA community diversity were observed based on the contribution of differing terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) to managed and native soils based on analysis of similarity (ANOSIM, R value greater than 0.6 p<0.05). In contrast, native soils displayed higher similarity to one-another, despite significant spatial separation, than either agriculturally influenced site. In native soils located adjacent to a slightly acidic switchgrass cultivated site, TRFs affiliated with members of the genus Nitrososphaera were abundant. The same genus were found in significantly lower abundance in cultivated sites. In contrast, TRFs attributed to the genus Nitrosotalea were dominant in the switchgrass cultivated site, but were detected in substantially lower abundance in the cultivated site. In addition, a higher number of TRFs were observed in the non-managed areas, indicative of a more diverse AOA community. At the slightly alkaline site, similar differences between native and cultivated AOA communities were also observed. However, the most abundant TRFs in the native soils were non-detectable in the cultivated areas, suggesting a complete replacement of native ecotypes. Preliminary TRF identification suggests different phylogentically distinct members of the genus Nitrosophaera are responsible for the observed shifts between native and cultivated soils. Taken together, our results suggest that agricultural land-management significantly alters AOA community diversity patterns for the soils examined. These results can inform future reseatch to assess whether these soils are also attributed with differing rates of nitrogen usage and production of fugitive gases, parameters that would be useful for modeling the impacts of switchgrass cultivation on nitrogen cycling soil ecosystems.

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Anna Simpson’s General Exam – Monday July 21st at 1PM

When: Monday July 21st at 1PM

Where: Anderson 22

Title: Nitrogen Cycling and Response to Increased Nitrogen Deposition in Alpine Soils of the Pacific Northwest

Committee: Darlene Zabowski (Chair), Bob Edmonds, Gina Rochefort, Tom DeLuca, David Stahl

Abstract: Until relatively recently high elevation ecosystems in western National Parks were not subject to elevated levels of nitrogen deposition (Wolfe et al. 2001) compared with the eastern United States. However, nitrogen deposition has now become of special concern to National Parks in the mountainous western United States because it is increasing. In addition, high-elevation ecosystems are particularly sensitive to climate change. It is likely that climate change will result in higher temperatures, more precipitation in the form of rain, higher snowlines, and earlier snowmelt (Beniston et al. 1997, Mote et al. 2005); in combination, these effects might very well increase alpine soil acidity, soil formation, and leaching of nitrates into surface waters even without increasing nitrogen deposition. A recent review of the effects of nitrogen deposition warns that although critical loads for particular areas are generally set at the point where the community begins to shift, individual species may experience changes at any level of nitrogen deposition above background (Payne et al. 2013). Thus the protection and evaluation of pristine environments should be among the highest priorities for the study of nitrogen deposition.

I propose to address critical loads for nitrogen deposition in alpine meadows at Mount Rainier (MORA), North Cascades (NOCA), and Olympic (OLYM) National Parks, through a fertilization study (begun in 2012), simulating increasing nitrogen deposition in a randomized block design at alpine sites at these three parks using three different levels of 15N-labeled ammonium nitrate, monitoring plant growth and diversity, and sampling plant and soil tissues for nitrogen retention and microbial abundance and diversity.

I will also investigate nitrogen storage and microbial communities in barren high-elevation soils through soil sampling up to 2,734 m (9,000 feet) at Mount Rainier and North Cascades National Parks. Increasing nitrogen deposition in the Pacific Northwest combined with higher temperatures will most likely push snowlines to higher elevations and accelerate soil formation and nitrogen accumulation. Thus, examining these sites will provide fundamental information about extreme ecosystems microbiomes and nitrogen use.

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Keala Hagmann Dissertation Defense July 24th AND 22, 10 am

Please join us at my dissertation defense in Anderson 22 on Thursday, July 24 at 10 am.

Dissertation Title: Historical forest conditions in frequent-fire forests on the eastern slopes of the Oregon Cascade Range

Committee: Jerry Franklin (chair), Jonathan Bakker, Stevan Harrell, Thomas Hinckley, Norm Johnson, Kristiina Vogt, and Daniel Schwartz (GSR)

Abstract: Records from a 1914-25 timber inventory reveal historical variability at the landscape-level in fire-prone forests in the eastern Cascade Range in Oregon. Live conifers >15 cm dbh (diameter at breast height) were tallied by species and size class in a 20% sample of over 180,000 hectares (ha). Forests were predominantly low density relative to current conditions (roughly a third to a quarter of current mean density). Total stand density, large tree (>53 cm dbh) density, and ponderosa pine density were relatively stable across a wide moisture gradient (40-180 cm annual precipitation). Large trees, primarily large ponderosa pine and secondarily Douglas-fir, dominated total basal area (>70% of total mean basal area) and were widely distributed across the landscape (present on 97% of transects). Currently ponderosa pine and large trees no longer dominate total basal area and large trees are not as uniformly distributed across the landscape as they were historically. Higher-density values (>120 tph, 95th percentile), although rare, were widely distributed across the mixed-conifer habitat while treeless transects (no trees >15 cm dbh) were almost entirely restricted to documented burned areas at higher elevations in colder, wetter habitat types and in association with an 80,000 ha fire that burned in 1918 in ponderosa pine and lodgepole pine habitat. Historical forest conditions in frequent-fire forests may be increasingly useful in guiding contemporary forest management given 1) projections for increased drought; 2) increases in vertical and horizontal connectivity of forest canopies related to changes in land use; and 3) documented resilience and resistance of historical forest conditions to fire and drought-related stressors in fire-prone forests. This systematic sample of a large landscape provides information about variability in species composition, densities, and structures at multiple spatial scales, which are highly relevant to management activities to restore and conserve desired ecosystem functions.

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Lisa Miller MEH defense June 11th 2pm – Isaacson Classroom

"Changes towards environmentally responsible behaviors with an increased knowledge of local systems:

An urban case study in Seattle, WA"

Lisa Miller

Wednesday June 11th, at 2pm

Center for Urban Horticulture- Isaacson Classroom

Committee: Kern Ewing, Jim Fridley, Stanley Asah

Abstract:

Providing easy to understand information may help get people involved in their local environment. Presenting information in a casual and interactive setting as well as tailoring it to personal interests and lifestyles may offer a unique learning experience outside the traditional classroom.

Come see how a short series of workshops were developed and presented to encourage personal engagement in Seattle’s urban nature.

Thank you,

Lisa

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Alina Cansler’s PhD Proposal Presentation – Friday June 6th 12:00 pm, Anderson 22

Members of the SEFS community and the general public are invited to attend the oral portion of Alina Cansler’s general exam, on Friday, June 6 from 12:00 to 1:00 pm in Anderson Hall, room 22, during which Alina will present her proposed PhD research: “Influence of Fire and Post-fire Succession in Alpine Treeline Ecotones in the northwestern USA" Refreshments and light snacks will be provided.

What: Alina Cansler’s PhD proposal defense (General Exam)

Time: Friday, June 6, 2014, 12:00 pm

Location: Anderson Hall, room 22

Title: Influence of Fire and Post-fire Succession in Alpine Treeline Ecotones in the northwestern USA

Abstract:

Across the western U.S., climate change presents perhaps the biggest challenge to both the idea and the conservation of protected areas, particularly in the context of dynamic and rapidly changing disturbance regimes. This project will examine the effects of a shift in the fire regime of an ecosystem that is very sensitive to climate change: the ecotone from closed forest to open alpine tundra, hereafter the alpine treeline ecotone (ATE). Increased tree establishment in subalpine parkland and an upward movement of treeline are expected in a warming climate, but changes in other factors, particularly disturbance regimes, have received less attention. The same climate warming has been linked to increased area burned by wildfires across the West; indeed the same factors associated with increased tree establishment in some areas—decreased snowpack and longer growing seasons—will also encourage wildfire in subalpine parkland.

It is presently unclear how the subalpine ecotone will respond to the combination of the direct effects of climate and the indirect effects of changing fire regimes. This proposed project will examine burn severity and post-fire regeneration in the subalpine ecotone along elevational and maritime-continental gradients. Geospatial data, aerial photography, and field data will used to understand the relative influences of climate, fire, and endogenous factors (local topography, soils, and biological legacies), thereby enabling inferences about the future of the subalpine parkland in fire-prone ecosystems. This research project addresses our current lack of knowledge about the extent to which recent increases in area burned have impacted the ATE, and how fire changes the location, pattern, and species diversity in the ATE. Because the combined effects of fire occurrence in the ATE, and post-fire pattern and species shifts may have long-term impacts on ecosystem functions such as wildlife habitat use, hydrology, nutrient cycling, and carbon sequestration, research on the drivers and the effects of fire in the ATE is needed.

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Martha Moritz MEH defense, June 10th DRC noon

Martha Moritz, MEH defense: June 10th from 12-1:00 in the Douglas Research Classroom (DRC) at the Center for Urban Horticulture.

“Kincaid Ravine Restoration and Management Plan”

Committee: Kern Ewing and Jim Fridley

Abstract:

The Kincaid Ravine restoration project is located in an undeveloped section of the northeastern corner on the University of Washington Seattle campus. The project site is an approximately four acre forested area, with a native deciduous tree dominated canopy. The forest contains a mixed understory of both native and non-native species. Two wetlands and an unnamed stream channel are present within the project boundaries. This portion of campus is a designated natural area, which means it will remain undeveloped in the future.

The dominating presence of non-native, invasive species in the understory and the groundlayer of the site, historic clearing of the site, and impacts from construction that has taken place in the surrounding matrix has resulted in an overall decline in health and function of this urban forest over the last several decades. At this stage of typical forest succession, a mixed tree canopy containing both conifer and deciduous tree species should be present. The overwhelming growth of English ivy (Hedera helix) on the forest floor has eliminated the necessary light levels to foster the germination of native conifer species. Other invasive species growing in the site, including Himalayan blackberry (Rubus armeniacus), English laurel (Prunus laurocerasus), and old man’s beard (Clematis vitalba) have reduced the diversity of the native plant assemblage that should exist in a Puget Sound lowland forest. In addition to the declines in ecosystem function, the dense growth of non-native species has led to the site being used for illegal encampments. These encampments pose a risk to public safety and have increased negative perception of the site.

Funds to begin the restoration work needed within the Kincaid Ravine were secured through the Campus Sustainability Fund (CSF) during the 2012-2013 academic year. A partnership between UW Grounds Management, CSF, Earthcorps, and the UW-chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration was formed in order to complete the restoration work. Work within the project area began in January 2014. The primary tasks during the first year of the restoration project were to clean up garbage and debris from the work area, remove non-native species, and install a variety of native trees and shrubs. At this time, restoration tasks have been initiated in roughly half of the total project area.

Along with the restoration work, a site management plan was developed in order to create a framework that will allow restoration efforts to continue in the Kincaid Ravine. The long-term goals of the project are to: improve the overall ecosystem functioning of the urban forest, increase public safety, and create a space that allows students to participate in the restoration work and promotes the use of the site for further academic research.

Martha Moritz

Masters in Environmental Horticulture, Candidate
UW Botanic Gardens, School of Environmental and Forest Sciences
Integrated Pest Management and Sustainability Coordinator, Grounds Management
Plant Operations – Annex 4
Box 352166
Seattle, WA 98195

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Oliver Jan’s Thesis defense June 5th 1pm BLD 292

Oliver Jan, M.S. Thesis Defense

Committee: Prof. Fernando Resende (Chair), Prof. Renata Bura, Prof. Richard Gustafon

Thursday, June 5th at 1PM

Bloedel 292

"Hydropyrolysis of Lignin using Pd/HZSM-5"

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Johnny Bruce PCMI Master’s Project Defense Thu June 5th 11:15am AND 22

"A Case Study of Cooking Practices in Paraguay"

Thursday, June 5th, 11:15am Anderson 22

My committee members are Ivan Eastin (chair) and Bruce Bare

Johnny Bruce

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Jon Diemer MEH Defense, Tue May 27th @ 2pm, Isaacson Classroom, Center for Urban Horticulture

Jon Diemer MEH Defense, Tuesday May 27th @ 2pm, Isaacson Classroom, Center for Urban Horticulture
“Centennial Woods Restoration and Management Plan”

Committee: Kern Ewing (chair), Jim Fridley, Darlene Zabowski

Summary:
Restoration was performed on a site originally planted in 2007 at the University of Washington’s Union Bay Natural Area. Improper planting techniques and timing, extreme weather, and inadequate maintenance resulted in approximately 90% mortality. This project utilized a more systematic approach and best practices, as well as continuous maintenance over a two-year period, which included invasive species control and watering during the summer droughts. Tree species native to the Puget Sound lowlands were planted, as well as some from warmer climate zones. The latter were included in order to assess their long-term survival and growth compared with native species, in relation to how climate change might affect temperature and precipitation over time. To increase diversity even further, several native understory species were planted. Because there are still areas with little shade, the understory species that were selected are those able to survive in full sun, but which will do even better as the canopy develops. A wood chip trail was constructed through the site to facilitate access during the restoration, as well as provide future public access. Finally, a Management Plan was developed, which presents suggestions on how to ensure the long-term success of the site as the trees and understory vegetation mature. Recommendations include soliciting community involvement in continued maintenance activities and adding interpretive signage along the trail to educate the public regarding ecological restoration in general, site and project history, and information about the species that were planted.

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Stephan Gmur Final Exam Friday May 30th 10:30am AND 207

My exam is scheduled for Friday May 30th at 10:30 in the Forest Club Room (Anderson 207).

Title: Exploring tropical ecosystem drivers of productivity using GIS, remote sensing and meta-analysis

Committee: Daniel Vogt (chair), Kristiina Vogt, Jerry Franklin, Asep Suntanta, Peter Lape

Abstract: Many research studies have characterized the primary productivity of tropical forests and contributed to highlighting the complexity of underlying drivers of the ecological system. However, few studies have explored how productivity changes across multiple scales and how the drivers controlling productivity might differ depending on climatic and edaphic factors. Most know that modeling of the earth’s surface using remote sensing within a geospatial format is limited by the spatial resolution of the technology and also the relative small temporal resolution of forestry inventory information. However even when we construct our models from this information knowing errors have probably been incorporated, we have a tendency to overlook those limitations because we generally don’t have access to information containing fewer errors. This is especially critical to remember and understand when trying to model a system which is not completely understood or where robust information may not exist. Therefore it is helpful to be able to identify any critical thresholds of productivity so that one can determine when tipping points may occur in complex ecosystems. Determining the critical thresholds and tipping points for productivity would therefore allow us to then recognize the empirical indicators that may trigger a system or its components to shift from one state to another. This would then allow us to better understand the heterogeneity that exits in productivities at the local scales.

To search for potential thresholds and tipping points for productivity across scales, a study was designed to search for any relationships between empirical productivity data from tropical forest studies and other parameters such as climatic and edaphic variables. This study used the tools provided by meta-analysis, spatial modeling and quantification of human impacts at the local level to identify which combination of variables might reveal potential thresholds of the productivity. The performance of these variables was then used within a modeling environment to understand the underlying assumptions and how forest cover at the local scale is impacted by anthropogenic activities in relation to policy implementations. At the global level those variables that best explain the spatial heterogeneity of total productivities at plot scales was based on using a meta-analysis of aggregated field data from 96 natural forests from the American, Asian and African tropics.
These data suggested that 73% of the variance in total net primary productivity (NPPt) could be explained by different combinations of four
variables: soil-order, soil-texture, precipitation group and mean air temperature. If variations in NPPt by soil order, soil texture, precipitation group, and mean air temperature are not factored into modeling activities, regional estimates could over- or under-estimates total productivity potentials.

At the regional level, underlying assumptions about a modeling environment were tested to determine how 20, 15, 10, five and one-km sampling resolutions using different occupancy selection criteria altered the distribution and importance of input variables as well as which variables were significant within the prediction model. Variances explained by predictive models were similar across cell sizes although relative importance of variables differed by sampling resolution.
Partial dependence plots were used to search for potential thresholds or tipping points of NPP change as affected by an independent variable such as minimum daytime temperature. Applying different cell occupancy selection rules significantly changed the overall distribution of NPP values. Finally, policy additionality was measured by investigating anthropogenic activities within the Mount Halimun Salak National Park in reducing deforestation by implementing spatially explicit use zones.
Results showed that for the period 2003 – 2013, strict conservation areas had a 6.2% lower rate of deforestation relative to all other use zones combined. The relative rate of deforestation was higher in the Special Research & Training zone, which is a designated area for local communities to acquire livelihood resources. Deforestation was lowest in the Rehabilitation zone which are forests designated as areas to restore lands characterized as degraded and deforested.

Thanks,
Stephan

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Cynthia Harbison PCMI Master’s Defense 10am May 20th AND 22

What: Cynthia Harbison Peace Corps Master’s International Defense

Title: Coping With Resource Constraints: Two Case Studies in Cameroon

When: 10 am Tuesday May 20th, 2014

Where: Anderson 22

Committee: Dr. Ivan Eastin (Chair), Dr. Clare Ryan, Dr. Stanley Asah

Abstract: Cameroon is an extraordinarily diverse country and is home to heavily forested tropical, savannah, and sahelian ecosystems. The incredible diversity of the country leads to a corresponding diversity of development issues. While the country has a large portion of its population living in subsistence states in the rural country, the constraints on these villages vary vastly based on the geographic and environmental locations of the villages. The two sites faced very different resource constraints: one site was located in a lush rain forest, and faced very little natural resource constraints but was very isolated from markets, while the other was located in the dry Sahel and was primarily faced with water and soil fertility issues. The different constraints call for site specific interventions and illustrate how geography affects appropriate poverty alleviation interventions.

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Seth Wing Thesis Defense, Wed May 28th 2pm AND 22

Seth Wing

M.S. Thesis Defense

Committee Members: Darlene Zabowski (chair), Rob Harrison, Dan Vogt

Wednesday, May 28th at 2pm

Anderson 22

"Reservoir Sediment Carbon along the Elwha River after Dam Removal"

Seth Wing
M.S. Candidate
University of Washington
School of Environmental and Forest Sciences

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Amita Banerjee Thesis Defense, May 14th AND 22, 1pm

I have scheduled my Masters thesis defense on May 14th, 2014.

Where: Anderson 22 at 1:00 p.m.

Committee: Dr. David Ford (Chair), Dr. Elizabeth van Volkenburgh, Dr. Soo Hyung Kim

Abstract:

Maize leaves are characterized by a complex curvature which keeps changing with increasing leaf age. Due to the curvature of a maize leaf the amount of light intercepted may vary on different points on the surface of the leaf giving rise to a variation in photosynthesis along the curvature of the leaf. In this study semi-empirical models of photosynthetic light response curve have been used to understand the variation in photosynthesis along the leaf curvature. The effect of increasing age on photosynthesis of a maize leaf was investigated and modelled. Non-linear regression was used to study the pattern of variation of photosynthesis with increasing leaf age.

Thanks,

Amita

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Kendall Becker Thesis Defense, Tues May 13th 11am AND 207

My thesis defense is scheduled for next Tuesday, May 13th, at 11:00 am in the Forest Club Room (Anderson 207).

Title: Effects of lower-severity fire on species composition and structure in montane forests of the Sierra Nevada, California, USA.

Committee: Greg Ettl (chair), Jim Lutz (co-chair), and Don McKenzie

Abstract: This study examines the effects of undifferentiated- to moderate-severity fire and modeled climatic water balance (i.e., actual evapotranspiration and climatic water deficit) on species composition and structure of montane forests in Yosemite and Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks. I use tree species and diameter data from 97, 0.1 ha plots, 46 that have remained unburned since at least 1930 and 51 that have burned at lower-severity since 1984, to (1) compare the diameter distributions of seven common conifer species at burned and unburned plots and (2) identify species-specific diameter thresholds of fire sensitivity. My results suggest that lower-severity fire is insufficient to reverse compositional changes that have occurred as a result of fire suppression management practices. Land management strategies designed to conserve forest structure rather than species composition may therefore become increasingly important. I present a framework for analyzing forest structural communities to facilitate this shift in management paradigms.

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Jeffrey C Lewis, Dissertation defense Monday, 12 May 2014

Jeffrey C. Lewis

Defense Presentation: 3:30-4:50pm on Monday, 12 May 2014, at the Wildlife Seminar (147 Architecture Hall)

Committee members: Drs. Steve West (chair), Keith Aubry, Kurt Jenkins, Toby Bradshaw, and Aaron Wirsing

Title: The post-release movements, survival, and landscape-scale resource selection of fishers (Pekania pennanti) reintroduced to Olympic National Park.

Abstract: The fisher (Pekania pennanti) is a mid-sized carnivore in the weasel family (Mustelidae) that occurred throughout the temperate and boreal forest ecosystems of North America. Because of the extremely high value of the fisher’s pelt in the 1800s and early 1900s, fisher populations were overexploited and extirpated throughout much of the southern portion of the historical fisher range (southern Canada and northern U.S). Translocations have been successful at restoring fishers throughout much of the vacant portions of the historical range, however little information from these translocations is available in the published literature. As part of the fisher recovery process in Washington state, we translocated 90 fishers (50 F, 40 M) from central British Columbia to the Olympic Peninsula. We radio-collared each fisher to allow investigations of post-release movements, survival and resource selection of a large sample of translocated fishers. Fishers moved extensively after their release and the extent of these movements was best explained by sex, and the month when movements occurred. Similarly sex was the most influential factor in explaining the distances between release sites and established home ranges of 48 fishers (27 F, 21 M) that established home ranges. Mean distance (±SE) from a release site to an established home range was 44.5 ± 6.4 km for males and 30.1 ± 3.6 km for females; however the mean number of days from release until home range establishment was similar for the sexes. Twenty-six of 27 females established home ranges from December to October of their first year and the distribution of establishment dates did not differ from uniform distribution (χ² = 7.00, df = 10, P = 0.725). Conversely, 19 of 21 males established home ranges between April and July of their first year and this distribution of establishment dates differed from a uniform distribution (χ² = 46.571, df = 10, P < 0.001). Twenty-one of the 27 females (78%) and 9 of 21 males (43%) established home ranges within the Olympic Fisher Recovery Area (i.e., Olympic National Park and Olympic National Forest). Mean home range sizes for males (128.3 km2) and females (63.5 km2) were among the largest reported for the species.

The survival of the founders was most strongly influenced by the year in which they were released (cohort), season of the year, sex, and age; duration of captivity, weight, release-date and number of canines did not influence survival. The importance of influential variables was best explained by the lower survival rates of fishers released in year 2 (cohort), the lower survival rates of fishers during the breeding season (season), the higher survival rates of males (sex) and the higher survival rates of juveniles (age). Point estimates for survival rates were highest for juvenile males (0.65-0.94; range of annual survival for the 3 cohorts), followed by adult males (0.69-0.91), juvenile females (0.46-0.89) and adult females (0.37-0.86); this finding is the opposite of what is commonly found in established fisher populations, where adult females often have the highest survival rates and juveniles have the lowest. Cause of mortality was determined for 24 of 35 recovered fishers; predation was the leading cause of mortality (40%) followed by vehicle strikes (20%), drowning (6%) and trapping-related (3%). Predation and vehicle strikes appeared to be more common as causes of mortality in our study than in most other studies of fisher mortality.

The selection of established home ranges differed between the sexes as well as the degree of selectivity. Most (79%) females established home ranges within the unmanaged forest landscapes of the Olympic Fisher Recovery Area. A resource selection model that included the amount of mid-seral forest and mean elevation was clearly the best among the 17 models that we evaluated, indicating substantial selection by females. Because most females established home ranges within unmanaged forest landscapes in Olympic National Park, they selected unmanaged mid-seral forests within landscapes dominated by unmanaged mid and late-seral forests. Most (56%) males established home ranges on managed forest landscapes and exhibited a selection for home ranges with smaller overstory trees and greater amounts of early seral forest than was available within the study area; however all 17 models of resources selection received some level support by the data, indicating weaker selection by males for the variables we included in our models. The amount of natural open space was the factor that best distinguished male and female use of home range core areas, with females using cores area with substantially less natural open areas than males.

This work represents the first investigations of survival and resource selection and the second investigation of post-release movements of a translocated fisher population, and it provides insights into the factors that influence translocation success. Our findings should be particularly useful for managers that are assessing the feasibility or developing an implementation plan for a fisher translocation.

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Jason James Thesis Defense Tue May 6th 8am

Jason James

M.S. Thesis Defense

Committee Members: Rob Harrison (chair), Darlene Zabowski, Drew Gorman-Lewis

Tuesday, May 6th at 8 AM

Winkenwerder 107

"Deep Soil: Quantification, Modeling, and Significance of Carbon and Nitrogen in Subsurface Layers"

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QERM Dissertation Defense: Ingrid Spies, Monday, April 21st at 2:00 p.m.

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Please join us at the

QERM Dissertation Defense presented by:

Ingrid Spies, Ph.C.

Quantitative Ecology and Resource Management

Interdisciplinary Graduate Program

University of Washington

"New approaches in the bridge between genetics and fisheries management."

2:00 p.m.

Monday, April 21, 2014

Fishery Sciences Building (FSH), Room 109

1122 NE Boat St., Seattle, WA

MAP: http://uw.edu/maps/#!/fsh

PARKING: Limited pay parking is available off Boat St. (Shoppers Lot, west end of Fishery Sciences, $7/day), as well as some metered street parking. There is a UW parking garage on Brooklyn Ave. (just east of Fishery Sciences), and the daily rate is $11, but this lot often fills up early in the morning. For information about UW visitor parking, see http://washington.edu/admin/parking/.

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Ellen Weir Gen Exam, Wed April 16 9am

Ellen Weir – General Exam

Wednesday, April 16th, 9:00am

Anderson Hall, Room 22

"Assessing the Social Acceptability of Endophyte-Assisted Phytoremediation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)"

Committee: Sharon Doty (Chair), Elizabeth Sanders, Gordon Bradley, Cassandra Garcia, Lucy Jarosz (GSR)

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Spusmen Wilder MS defense Th Mar 20, 10am AND 22

Hello all,

Just wanted to extend an invitation to my MS thesis defense.

Title:

Quantifying landscape spatial patterns: a framework for collaborative forest management on tribal and federal lands

Time:

Thursday, Mar. 20, 2014 @ 10 am

Locale:

Anderson Hall, Room 22

University of WA, Seattle campus

Committee:

Ernesto Alvarado (chair), Susan Stevens Hummel, Tom Hinckley, Phil Rigdon

Description:

This project is a case-study focused on the Yakama Nation Tribal Forest and USFS Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. We quantified spatial patterns and environmental and management factors associated to patterns. Results identified several ecological and management implications useful to collaborative forest management networks.

Good day,

Spus

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