Category Archives: course

Advanced Remote Sensing and Earth Observation Course

Please see the attached flier for CEE 498/SEFS 521 Advanced Remote Sensing and Earth Observation. This course will examine the theory and application of satellite remote sensing as a tool for environmental science. David Butman from Environmental and Forest Sciences will be the professor.

CEE 498 SEFS 521 Remote Sensing Spring 2018.pdf

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Tatoosh 2018 | Summer field study and research opportunity in Alaska

Summer field courses and research in Southeast Alaska!

Tatoosh School

Learn more about course costs and our Bridger Scholarship Fund

Apply now as courses are filling fast!

Scroll our Instagram to see pictures and videos from the field.

Questions? Email peter@tatooshschool.org

The Tatoosh School is a nonprofit, university-level field school with a beachfront base camp on Prince of Wales Island and lecture halls in the towns, ocean, and forests of Alaska’s Inside Passage. It is the school’s mission to foster first-hand learning about the ecology and environmental policy of southern Southeast Alaska.

Rigorous academics focus on the development of a sense of place, a passion for civic engagement and a sound knowledge of the Pacific coastal ecoregion. You can earn up to 20 quarter units of credit and leave empowered to explore your surroundings with wide-eyed curiosity and to reach out as an active and informed citizen.

Students are field scientists and participate in several long-term ecological research programs in collaboration with our partners. Gain invaluable experience and professional connections that can last a lifetime.

 

3-week Intensive: May 21 – June 11, 2018

Community Ecology: Salmon, People, Place

 

6-week Summer Session:  June 20 – August 1, 2018

Aquatic and Terrestrial Ecology + Politics of Place + Applied Methods


10-week Semester Equivalent:  May 21 – August 1, 2018

Community Ecology; independent travel; Aquatic and Terrestrial Ecology; and, Politics of Place


Details:

3-week Intensive: May 21 – June 11, 2018

Community Ecology: Salmon, People, Place

5 semester or 8 quarter units

 

This 3-week intensive focuses on the communities that inhabit the heart of the Pacific Coastal Ecoregion. Conceived broadly, the course theme of community ecology launches explorations from the outer coast to the Inside Passage to study interactions at varying scales and across biological, social, biophysical, and cultural boundaries.

The CE course will begin with a 4-7 day backcountry expedition in the Prince of Wales Island archipelago. The remainder of CE will be spent in the forests and rivers of Prince of Wales, with a base camp in Coffman Cove, and wrap up in the town of Wrangell. Classes will be interdisciplinary, conducted in both lecture- and activity-based formats.

Course Descriptions:

 

Community Ecology: Salmon, People, Place (4 semester or 6 quarter units, 410/510) examines the physical, biological, economic and political frameworks essential to informed stewardship if salmon-producing watersheds, healthy forests, and communities in the Pacific Coastal Ecoregion. Students practice stream, upland forest and community survey and monitoring techniques that contribute to long-term collaborative stewardship work. A community ecology lens adds consideration of organizations and networks on the landscape and in human communities, enhancing students’ knowledge of resiliency and sustainability in the ecoregion.

 

Applied Methods in Field Research and Education (1 semester or 2 quarter units, 410/510) explores methods for the development and implementation of active teaching and research programs that integrate people, leadership, academics, community, and ecology. Course content will explore non-formal teaching and learning techniques, place-based education, and community interaction in higher education.


6-week Summer Session:  June 20 – August 1, 2018

Aquatic and Terrestrial Ecology + Politics of Place + Applied Methods

9 semester or 14 quarter units

 

The Core Session expedition includes three upper-division classes taken concurrently, these are ecology, natural resource policy, and applied field research methods.

 

Course Descriptions:

 

Aquatic & Terrestrial Ecology of Southeast Alaska (4 semester or 6 quarter units, 410/510). Students develop an understanding of key ecological principals of aquatic and terrestrial systems, from the nearshore intertidal zone to the high alpine. This class also examines the adaptations and relationships of organisms to their environments over time and space.

 

Politics of Place: Southeast Alaska (4 semester or 6 quarter units, 410/510). Topics include land ownership, public and private land management, conservation strategies, local and regional economies, Alaska Native cultures and communities, and contemporary resource management issues. A focus is placed on the evolution of social and legal structures, and how these structures guide current decision-making.  Inquiry and reason are applied to real-life challenges, and students engage with citizens and policymakers to consider solutions.

 

Applied Methods in Field Research and Education (1 semester or 2 quarter units, 410/510) explores methods for the development and implementation of active teaching and research programs that integrate people, leadership, academics, community, and ecology. Course content will explore ecological and socio-economic research methods, non-formal teaching and learning techniques, place-based education, and community interaction in higher education.


10-week Semester Equivalent:  May 21 – August 1, 2018

Community Ecology; independent travel; Aquatic and Terrestrial Ecology; and, Politics of Place, Applied Methods

13 semester or 20 quarter units

 

This program combines our 3-week intensive and our 6-week summer session to offer a full summer in Alaska. From nearshore aquatic habitat monitoring to the impacts of transboundary mining, the Semester Equivalent surveys the complex issues facing North America’s largest temperate rainforest. Lengthy immersion in the backcountry and rural communities from Sea Otter Sound to the Stikine River provides students the opportunity to dig deeper on topics that fit their major or course of study and work closely with faculty and guest lecturers.

Topics covered will include–but aren’t limited to!–Alaska Native studies, climate change, collaborative governance, community development, fisheries, forestry, glaciology, paleontology, public lands management, restoration ecology, sustainable aquaculture, international law and politics, and wildlife conservation.

Students enrolled in the Semester Equivalent will stack the 3-week intensive and the 6-week summer session to build your 10-week program. During the week between, you may travel independently or enjoy downtime in Wrangell. Students enroll in up to 20 quarter units in community ecology, applied methods in field research and education, aquatic and terrestrial ecology, and politics of place.

 

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New Diversity & Justice course, GRDSCH 640

The Graduate School is pleased to announce a new course for the Spring quarter entitled:

“Engaging with Microaggressions & Macroassaults- Equity in Praxis”.

We invite graduate students, faculty, and staff from all disciplines to participate in this interdisciplinary course which seeks to equip participants to critically engage with microaggressions and macroassaults- both the everyday insults and hostilities as well as the structural, large-scale policies and practices that perpetuate the oppression of marginalized populations. Inspired by Paulo Freire’s notion of praxis (the intersection of reflection and action), the course will work to empower participants to address, interrupt, and confront these forces in their personal and professional lives.

Please see the attached flyer for more information.

You may email Saejin Kwak Tanguay (gsdivra@uw.edu) with any questions.

—-

Saejin Kwak Tanguay, M.Ed.

Ph.D. Candidate in Multicultural Education | College of Education

Research Assistant for the Office of Diversity and Student Affairs | The Graduate School

University of Washington

Pronouns: She, her, hers

GRDSCH 640 Spring 2018 Course Flyer.pdf

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Education Rome – Priority Deadline Feb. 15th

A quick reminder that the new Education Rome program focusing on masculinities, multiculturalism, and educational pipelines (more details below and on flyer attached) has its priority deadline this Thursday, Feb. 15th.

Rolling admissions will start this Friday and may close before the March 1st deadline if the program reaches capacity. Spots are already looking limited.

If you have questions, please don’t hesitate to let me know.

Tory Brundage, M.Ed.

Program Coordinator

Education Rome

______________________

Priority Deadline: February 15th

Program Dates: Aug. 17th – Sept. 7th, 2018

Total Program Fees: Estimated $4,800

Location: UW Rome Center, Italy

Program website: https://studyabroad.washington.edu/index.cfm?FuseAction=Programs.ViewProgram&Program_ID=11734

Spartacus to Ali: Masculinity and Multiculturalism – Comparing Educational Pipeline Development in Italy and the U.S. is a three-week Exploration Seminar based at the UW Rome Center in Italy. By comparing and contrasting the development of both Italian and American education systems, we will explore historical, social, psychological, political, and contemporary factors that have shaped and continue to shape the common trajectories among men in the two countries. A true titan of historical civilizations, Ancient Rome is arguably one of the largest and most influential empires the world has ever known. From gladiatorial training to the passing of the Casati Act and current day reform debates, what formal education has looked like and who has access to it are complicated questions. Answering those questions with respect to common male trajectories requires a rich understanding of historical influences, systems of oppression and how we make sense of masculinity in the context of race and class. Rome provides countless opportunities to explore Italian masculinity and male trajectories through history, art, and current day systems. This course will illuminate the factors that inform our understanding of various outcomes and experiences for Italian men as compared to American men. In addition to education, there will be critical discussions of other facets of Italian society and history such as sports culture, compulsory service, and the criminal justice system along with visits to the Colosseum, museums, Italian schools, and other field trips to broaden our understanding of male trajectories. An emphasis is placed on Italian incarceration as opposite education in examining the spectrum of common societal pipelines. This provides an important point of comparison to the school to prison pipeline in the U.S. as an anchoring point for a richer understanding and discussion of the relationship between education, masculinity, multiculturalism, historical disenfranchisement and systems of oppression.

Education Rome 2018 Flyer.pdf

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Spring Quarter Public Policy Undergraduate Courses

WE are excited to let you know that the Evans School of Public Policy & Governance has two undergraduate courses coming up in Spring quarter: PUBPOL 201: Introduction to Public Policy and Governance and PUBPOL 313: Evidence-based Implementation.

Both courses are open to all undergraduate students. A bit more about each:

PUBPOL 201—This introduction to the field of policy analysis, governance, and public service teaches students how to analyze and evaluate policy and actions, as well as how individuals organize for common purposes. Learn how institutional problems are solved for the betterment of society, how policies can be analyzed and measured for impact, and how public policies are designed and implemented in order to respond to complex challenges related to climate change, urban planning, social justice, city planning, and more.

· WHEN: It will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10:00-11:30 am.

· WHY: Because you want to change the world!

PUBPOL 313—This new course will explore the multidimensional challenge of turning policy and program intentions into valued results on the ground. To understand why the results of government initiatives so often fall short of expectation—and what might be done to raise the likelihood of policy success—requires an understanding of how public and nonprofit organizations work in practice: through their mission, resources, collaborations, and results measurement.

· WHEN: It will meet Tuesdays from 2:30-5:20 pm.

· WHY: Because you want to change the world!

 

Please contact us with any questions: evansreg@uw.edu.

Caitlin Blomquist, M.Ed.

Assistant Director of Student Services

Pronouns: she/her/hers

Evans School of Public Policy & Governance | University of Washington

109 Parrington Hall | Box 353055 | Seattle, WA 98195

cmb23@uw.edu | 206.616.1613

Schedule an academic advising appointment

Walk-In Advising Hours: Tuesdays 3-5 p.m. and Thursdays 10 a.m.-Noon

We acknowledge the people – past, present, and future – of the Dkhw’Duw’Absh, the Duwamish Tribe, the Muckleshoot Tribe, and other tribes on whose traditional lands we study and work.

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Applications due Thursday for Study Abroad Jordan

Applications Due Thursday (February 15) for UW-Faculty-led Study Abroad Engineering Jordan: Water in an Arid Land Study Water Engineering and Management in one of the most water-scarce in the World.

(August 26 through September 19, 2018)

Scholarships and Financial Aid Available!

to be eligible for scholarships, complete your application by: February 15
To access the application, use this link

* Study Abroad in Jordan with UW faculty.
* Learn about the connections among water resources and water engineering in one of the most water-scare nations in the world, and be ready to be amazed. * Interact with Jordanian students, scientists, and engineers.
* Tour desalination plants on the Dead Sea. Hike through water ravines. Tour wastewater treatment plants designed to reuse water. Visit the dying Azraq Oasis. View first-hand
archeological sites with ancient water infrastructure, including the UNESCO World Heritage site of Petra.

This course is co-sponsored by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; and the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences. It is led by UW faculty and counts as 5 credits toward your UW degree. Both graduate and undergraduate options available. CEE students earn credits (CEE 497 or CEWA 597) towards their major. And, new this year, ESRM 490 will focus on management perspectives across multiple stakeholders in water engineering.

Additional information can be found at the course canvas Information Page, or contact Dr. Heidi Gough, lead instructor at hgough@uw.edu
Heidi Gough, PhD, PE
Research Associate Professor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
University of Washington

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INFO SESSION 2/13: 2018 Summer Field Course in Alaska! FISH 497A

 

FISH 497A Special Topics: Ecological Research in Alaska

B Term, July 15 – August 15 (will overlap with A Term but students with interest should attend info session and ask about start date flex)

5 credits

  • Live and work in an active field research station
  • Conduct hands-on research in pristine, thriving, coastal Alaska watersheds
  • Work with renowned faculty Ray Hilborn, Tom Quinn, and Daniel Schindler

INFO SESSION: Tuesday February 13, 4:30pm in FSH 213

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 5pm, February 23

Questions? Contact Chris Boatright, cboat

Samantha Scherer, Student Services Manager and Undergrad Advising
Pronouns: she, her
UW School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences | Fishery Sciences Bldg, Suite116 | 206-543-7457
Office Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00-4:00
Website | Student Services Blog | Facebook

The University of Washington acknowledges the Coast Salish peoples of this land, the land which touches the shared waters of all tribes and bands within the Suquamish, Tulalip and Muckleshoot nations.

FISH497A AK SALMON_SUM2018.pdf

SUM2018 AK Salmon Program Application.docx

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French & Italian Studies Featured Spring Courses!

Hello Students!

 

Registration for spring quarter started today. French & Italian courses are a great way to fulfill your foreign language requirement, earn VLPA or I&S credit, prepare for the global business place, or get ready for a study abroad program.

 

Check out the featured courses from French & Italian Studies below!

 

Learn more about our Featured courses here

 

Find all spring quarter French courses here

Find all spring quarter Italian courses here

 

 

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Questions? email sabri@uw.edu or frenital@uw.edu

 

Department of French & Italian Studies

C-254 Padelford Hall, (206) 616-3486
UW Box 354361, Seattle, WA 98195

 

FIS_UW

 

 

 

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Undergraduate Course Opportunity through the School of Pharmacy

Dear Students,

Do you ever wonder:

· How drugs and vaccines work?
· Are herbal remedies effective?
· About the best way to prevent and treat illnesses?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you may be interested in PHARM 301: “Medications and Health: It’s Not All About Drugs”. This is a 3 credit, I&S/NW course with C/NC grading. This is a great course for any undergraduate interested in health sciences and especially for those interested in Pharmacy. All years of undergraduates are welcome!

Allison M. Stephens
Associate Director of Recruitment and Academic Advisor
Office of Professional Pharmacy Education
UW School of Pharmacy
South Campus Center 248A
Box 357631
Seattle, WA 98195-7631
sop.uw.edu | 206-616-0923

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SPR 2018 – NUTR 390 – Food Truck Rodeo

The SPR 2018 theme is Food Truck Rodeo! For students in the nutrition minor, this course counts as an upper-division elective. For more information about the course:

http://depts.washington.edu/nutr/food-truck-rodeo-course/

http://sph.washington.edu/news/article.asp?content_ID=8882

Thank you,

Kristin

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ESS307- Diversity Outreach Program course

ESS307 (3 or 5 cr) Diversity Outreach Program in Earth and Space Sciences

TTh 1:30-2:20, JHN022

DIV/NW or I&S

Prerequisites: One of ESS101, ESS102, ESS211, ESS212, ESS213, ESS472 (exceptions can be made, previous approval of the instructor)

Instructor: Isabel Carrera, micz@uw.edu

Students will be exposed to the barriers that underserved and underrepresented populations in the Northwest face prior to pursuing careers in STEM and will learn how to design culturally appropriate outreach activities.

This is a service learning course that mixes community-based work with lectures/seminars. . Undergraduates will be exposed to and experience first-hand the barriers that
underserved and underrepresented communities in the Pacific Northwest face prior to increase their interest in STEM. The credits for the participation in the class will be variable dependent on the hours volunteering:

* 3 credits: class time + 20 hrs volunteering/qtr
* 4 credits: class time + 30 hrs volunteering/qtr
* 5 credits: class time+ 40 hrs volunteering/qtr

A lab section has been added to prepare material for the outreach events in which students will participate.

ESS307 Flyer.pdf

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ENV H 409/509 Microbiome and Environmental Health

 

Inline image 1

 

ENVH_409_509_SPR18_flyer_Email.pdf

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SPR 18 GRADUATE COURSE OFFERING: ARCH 567/URBDP 519 – Qualitative Research Methods

Registration for non-majors opens up during Registration Period II & III. Students can register via either URBDP 519 or ARCH 567.

 

CLAUDINE MANIO
Graduate Program Adviser
Department of Architecture / College of Built Environments

ARCH 567_QualitativeResearchMethods_Spr18 .pdf

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WILD ROCKIES FIELD INSTITUTE- last minute opening on spring term field course!

Greetings from the Wild Rockies Field Institute!

My name is Bethany Applegate and I’m the Outreach Manager here at the Wild Rockies Field Institute, located in Missoula, Montana.

Maybe you’ve heard of WRFI, if not, here’s a little background: The Wild Rockies Field Institute is an off-campus study opportunity; WRFI offers academic field-based courses through the University of Montana. Our courses take place in the “Wild Rockies” of North America and combine rigorous academic inquiry with cultural immersion and extended backcountry expeditions. Students join us from colleges and universities across North America and from a wide variety of majors; we currently offer courses in Environmental Studies, Natural Resources & Science Management, Native American Studies, Geography, Science, and Philosophy. WRFI’s small group size and interdisciplinary curriculum offer students an exceptional opportunity to complement their coursework on campus with experiential education in the field.

We set the dates for our courses to coordinate with quarter-system schools and the reason I’m reaching out to you is that two spaces opened unexpectedly on our 2018 spring field course, “Colorado Plateau: Desert Canyons and Cultures”. This course has been full since November, so this is a unique opportunity! The course runs from March 28th- May 28th.
You can find out more about the course and our organization here: http://www.wrfi.net. I am more than happy to answer questions and provide course materials!

Opening on the Wild Rockies Field Institute’s “Colorado Plateau: Desert Canyons and Cultures” spring course!

DATES: March 28 – May 28, 2018 | American Southwest | 22.5 quarter-system credits

The Wild Rockies Field Institute offers field-based, academic courses to undergraduate students, accredited through the University of Montana and transferable to other universities and colleges.

WRFI’s spring term course, “Colorado Plateau: Desert Canyons and Cultures” will take you on the academic adventure of a lifetime, backpacking and canoeing through the American Southwest while you explore ancient and contemporary indigenous cultures, hone your naturalist skills, and learn about current land management strategies and challenges. Learn more on our website: http://www.wrfi.net/courses/colorado-plateau.html.

Scholarships Available! Federal Financial Aid may apply and payment plans are available. APPLY HERE!

THINK OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM!

Please Contact Bethany Applegate (WRFI Outreach Manager) with questions at bethany@wrfi.net or 406-549-4336.

Bethany Applegate | Outreach Manager

Wild Rockies Field Institute

406-549-4336 | http://www.wrfi.net

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Recreational Fisheries FISH 260 and 261 Spring 2018

FSH 260 and 261 2018 11 x 17 REV.pdf

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Course announcement: SMEA/ENVIR/JSIS B 103

Society and the Oceans SMEA/ENVIR/JSISB 103

Counts toward both I&S and NW credit requirements

5 Credits, Spring 2018

Professor Patrick Christie

Meets MWF 1-2:20 PM. Mary Gates Hall 231.

Class focus: Today the oceans have become the ultimate proving ground of whether humans are capable of achieving a sustainable relationship with a planet showing increasing signs of stress. Dealing with these complex human-environment interactions requires study rooted in both the social and natural sciences and responses that employ difficult-to-develop
institutional arrangements. Students will learn how human values, institutions, culture, and history shape environmental issues and policy responses. The course consists of four units: an introduction to how human values and interests shape our interactions, through time, with the marine environment; an examination of the concept of “tragedy of the commons”; a review of Washington State salmon and Southeast Asia coral reef marine environmental issues and current policy responses; and charting a path for marine policy. Lectures, discussion, and short writing exercises will used in class.

Tiffany Comtois-Dion

Graduate Program Advisor

Marine & Environmental Affairs

University of Washington

Society and Oceans_2018_poster.pdf

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FISH 497A Special Topics: Ecological Research in Alaska

FISH 497A Special Topics: Ecological Research in Alaska

B Term, July 15 – August 15 (will overlap with A Term but students with interest should attend info session and ask about start date flex)

5 credits

  • Live and work in an active field research station
  • Conduct hands-on research in pristine, thriving, coastal Alaska watersheds
  • Work with renowned faculty Ray Hilborn, Tom Quinn, and Daniel Schindler

INFO SESSION: Tuesday February 13, 4:30pm in FSH 213

Questions? Contact Chris Boatright, cboat@uw.edu

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ESRM 491D Summer Bee Course

ESRM491D blurb 2018 lg&& copy 3.pdf

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Spring Course: Outbreak Investigation & Response

UW Epidemiology is excited to offer the following undergraduate course for Spring 2018.

SPRING COURSE: EPI 201

Outbreak Investigation & Response

Take a step into the world of an outbreak investigator! Learn how disease outbreaks – such as Ebola, food-borne illnesses, and pandemic flu – start, spread, and are detected and investigated. You will explore the social and environmental factors that influence outbreaks, the agencies and systems in place to manage outbreak response, and the role of communications, law, and government. This course uses a combination of lectures, case studies, discussions, and popular media.

EPI 201 is a great addition to public health and pre-med coursework. No prerequisites and all majors are encouraged to enroll. Areas of Knowledge: I&S, NW, & QSR. Basic math skills are required.

Lecture: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 10:00-11:20 | Quiz: Friday, 11:30-12:20 or 12:30-1:20 | 5 credits | SLN 14070

Additional details about the course are provided on the attached flyer or can be found here. Direct questions to epcourse@uw.edu.

Janet Baseman, Course Instructor

Department of Epidemiology

School of Public Health

EPI201_Flyer for Spring 2018.pdf

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VLPA Courses – Good stuff!

 

Here are the Spring 2018 VLPA courses from Slavic.

 

Eloise M Boyle PhD
Program Coordinator and Undergraduate Adviser
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
University of Washington-Seattle
Box 354335 206.543.6848
slavadv

Check out our web site! slavic.washington.edu
Like us on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter @UwSlavic






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