Category Archives: course

CSE 120 CS Principles for non-majors

CSE 120 is for any students who may want to learn what CS is and/or earn 5 QSR and NW credits!

Thanks!

CSE Advising Team

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ESS 520: Applications in Geographic Information Systems for the Earth Sciences Course Flyer

Are you interested in GIS?

ESS 520: Applications in Geographic Information Systems for the Earth Sciences could be the perfect class for you!
Professor Walters, who teaches the course, is  open to having students from outside the ESS Department join the course.

Please feel free to refer to Professor Walters at swalt826@uw.edu should you have questions about the course.

Best,

Meghan Oxley

http://www.ess.washington.edu/ess/
ADVISING, ACADEMIC, & STUDENT SERVICES TEAM
UW Earth & Space Sciences
UW Box 351310| p. 206.616.8511 | Johnson Hall

Advising Drop-in Hours (AUT, WIN, SPR Only)

Meghan: 11AM-12PM Monday-Thursday

Noell: 10AM-11AM Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday
ESS 520 GIS Earth Sci Applications Win2018 flyer.pdf

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Limited space available in Winter Community Literacy Program: “C” or “W” course + public school internship

Limited space remains in the Community Literacy Program for winter quarter: English 298A (MW 10:30-12:20) linked with English 491B (internship, scheduled by students themselves). Winter 2018 is the final time this program will be offered during 2017-18.

Community Literacy Program is in its 27th year, and we have plenty of evidence that students love the sense of community and the impact of this program on their personal, academic, civic and professional lives. A flyer is attached, and information bellow and at https://english.washington.edu/community-literacy-program can be forwarded directly to students.

As most of you know already, the Community Literacy Program works well for students at any stage of their UW work and from any major. It fulfills the “C” or “W” requirement, and also elective and in some cases field work requirements in many majors and minors including ECFS, ECO and ELS. The program is a great way to solidify career and major decisions — or to test them out — in a small supportive learning community.

I’m always happy to answer questions

Elizabeth Simmons-O’Neill, Director, Community Literacy Program

___________________

English 298A + English 491B = the Community Literacy Program, an opportunity for students at any stage of your UW career and from any major to combine on-campus learning (for “C”
or “W” credit) with an internship putting your learning into practice in a high needs public elementary, middle or high school setting.

In English 298A (5 credits) you will meet twice weekly on campus (in Winter 2018 this will be MW 10:30-12:20) in a writing-intensive course focused on understanding and engaging
difference and inequality, learning effective inclusive methods of working with each other and with K-12 students, exploring some central challenges and opportunities for
transformative public education, and examining the role of mindfulness, compassion and emotional intelligence in learning. You will have opportunities to develop your skill and
confidence in discussion, writing, and presentation as we engage with these issues in relation to your academic, personal, civic and career goals The final assignment sequence
will be career-related writing — including identifying and creating application materials for a job or internship — taught in collaboration with the UW Career Center.

In English 491B Internship (C/NC; 3 credits) you will put what you learn on campus into action, volunteering (@4 hours a week, on a schedule you arrange) at one of our partner
public schools. English 491B will appear on your transcript as an internship and may be used toward the field work requirement or as an elective in the Education, Learning and
Society (ELS) Minor, and as an elective in both the Early Childhood and Family Studies (ECFS) and the Education, Communities and Organizations (ECO) Major. English 491B also
provides documentation of “high needs” school-based experience required for application to Teacher Education programs.

Contact CLP Director/Instructor Elizabeth Simmons-O’Neill with questions and to request add codes: esoneill@uw.edu
Community Literacy Program flyer.pdf

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English 283 and 284, beginning verse and beginning short story writing–open to non majors–VLPA

Do you know a physics major who has always wanted to be a poet?

A geography major that has always wanted to be a fiction writer? Now is their chance.

Our beginning verse and short story writing courses are now open to non majors.

And of course, both courses fulfill VLPA.

 

Restr 14294 A 5 MW 230-350 CHL 101 Kelly,Ainsley

Restr 14295 B 5 TTh 1030-1150 AND 008 Bierds,Linda L

Restr 22213 A 5 TTh 230-350 GWN 201 Arthur,Meagan Elise

Restr 14297 B 5 MW 1030-1150 THO 134 Destin,Sarah

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American Ethnic Studies – Open seats

Seats available in each American Ethnic Studies Concentration.

Explore the opportunities!

AES 380 A Race, Ethnicity, And United States Public Policy 10177 LaShawnDa Pittman TTh 12:30pm – 2:20pm I&S, DIV
AAS 350 A Critical Overseas Chinese/Chinese American Histories 10097 Connie So  

TT 1030-1220

F 1130-1220

 

I&S, DIV

AFRAM 498 A Special Topics In African American Studies Black Power on College Campuses 10191 La TaSha Levy MW 10:30am – 12:20pm

 

I&S, DIV
CHSTU 352 A Latina/o Migrations: A Comparative Analysis 12508 Carolyn Pinedo-Turnovsky MW 10:30am – 12:20pm I&S, DIV

 

American Ethnic Studies
Padelford Hall B-504, Box 354380
Seattle, WA 98195-4380
206.221.0664 / fax 206.616.4071
lthamill
https://aes.washington.edu/

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Winter Quarter Course: Are Do Gooders Doing Good?

The Carlson Center is excited to offer General Studies 344: Are Do Gooders Doing Good? Critical Perspectives on Civic Engagement during Winter Quarter! This course is ideal for
students at any level who have experience with community-based work and who are interested in exploring what it means to do good.

Are Do-Gooders Doing Good? Critical Perspectives on Civic Engagement (General Studies 344A; SLN 22163)

Are you committed to giving back? Trying to make a difference? Want to get more out of your volunteer experience and make a stronger impact in the community? During Winter
Quarter, we invite you to join in a critical reflection on what it truly means to “do good” in today’s social-cultural climate.

General Studies 348 will offer a hands-on opportunity to explore the concept of civic engagement. Students will critically reflect on their own service experiences through the
lens of identity theories, engage with principles of community work, and learn from the experiences of community leaders. In addition to those perspectives, the course will draw
upon current issues/events affecting various communities at large, as well as students’ involvement in service and will weave these together with elements of other academic coursework and future academic/career goals.

The course has a required service-learning component; students are encouraged to utilize current service commitments toward this requirement, though individualized support will
be offered to those looking for a service opportunity. This is a three-credit course that is offered as credit/no credit. Sessions will be held on Thursdays from 3:30-5:20PM in Mary Gates Hall.

Those interested in the course should email engage@uw.edu with questions and/or to request an add code.

KATHRYN PURSCH CORNFORTH

Associate Director

Carlson Leadership & Public Service Center

Undergraduate Academic Affairs

Mary Gates Hall, Suite 171 (The Center for Experiential Learning & Diversity)

206.616.0784 (office)

purschk@uw.edu

washington.edu/carlson

Kathryn uses she/her pronouns.

The University of Washington acknowledges the Coast Salish peoples of this land, the land which touches the shared waters of all tribes and bands within the Suquamish, Tulalip and Muckleshoot nations.

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ESS 101 Newly approved I&S credit!

ESS 101 has been updated, and is now an I&S/NW course! (This is not currently reflected on the W18 time schedule page, though it is listed on the course descriptions page.)

ESS 101 Introduction to Geology & Societal Impacts (5) I&S/NW
Introduction to the processes, materials and structures that shape Earth. Emphasizes the dynamic nature of the earth’s tectonic system and its relationship to physical features,
volcanism, earthquakes, minerals and rocks and geologic structures. The course emphasizes the intrinsic relationship between human societies and geologic processes, hazards and
resources. Not open for credit to students who have taken ESS 210. Optional field trips. Prerequisite: No prerequisite classes required. Offered: AWSpS.

More information can be found here: https://www.washington.edu/students/timeschd/WIN2018/ess.html

Thanks!

-Noell

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Looking for an interesting class about animals?

CHID 480 Section B : Animal Engagements: Writing and talking with nonhuman animals is a 5 credit I&S class offered Winter quarter!

This course will explore frameworks of inter-species relation developed in environmental humanities, critical animal studies, and other theory. Other readings will range from scientific logs to fairy tales, poetry to political propaganda; we will look at the different ways of knowing and treating animals in these works. All along, we will also be writing with animals, and students will keep journals of animal presences and absences. Our writing will attempt a variety of genres, including field descriptions, case reports, odes, and instructional text.

https://www.washington.edu/students/crscat/chid.html#chid480

SLN: 12455

 

 

 

 

 

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CEP 200: Intro to Community, Environment, and Planning – Winter Quarter, I & S

Our Community, Environment & Planning Director, Chris Campbell, teaches CEP 200 winter quarter. It is perfect for Freshmen and Sophomores looking for an active, small, community focused, engaging, and, experiential course.

Details below and flyer attached.
________________

CEP 200: Intro to Community, Environment, and Planning
5 Credits | I & S
Tuesdays & Thursdays | 1:30-3:50
Professor Christopher Campbell

Enjoy the day,

Kelly Hostetler | Program Manager
Community, Environment & Planning
Dept. of Urban Design and Planning
College of Built Environments
University of Washington
khoss4@uw.edu | 206.543.1508 | Gould 208Q
LinkedIn | http://cep.be.washington.edu
Study Sustainable Urban Mobility Abroad

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Career Strategy Course for Winter 2018

Hello!

The Career & Internship Center is happy to be offering the “Career Strategy & Job Search” course for juniors/seniors in the upcoming Winter and Spring quarters. The course for Winter 2018 is listed as GEN ST 391-G, #15112 and will be held once a week, Thursdays 2:30-4:20pm, with a class size of 50.

The alisonm3.

Thank you!

Alison

Alison McCarty, M.Ed.

Career Counselor / Career & Internship Center

134 Mary Gates Hall / Box 352810 / Seattle, WA 98195

Office 206.543.0535 / Direct 206.685.4096

alisonm3 / Schedule an appointment

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Humanities 201–Online introduction to the study of the humanities

I am writing to you to bring to your attention a course offering in WINTER QUARTER 2018 that I believe will be of interest to many students. The course is an online
version of a HUMANITIES 201, Introduction to the Humanities. This course, which is being co-taught by myself and Frances McCue, a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English,
is designed to expose undergraduate students to a cross-sampling of subject areas in the humanities. The course does not presuppose any prior college-level exposure to the
humanities and is targeted to lower-division (i.e., first- and second-year) students in departments and majors throughout the University. This is the second time that the course is being offered.

The humanities hold many different subject areas and this course will explore five of them: language, literature, history, visual culture, and musical culture. We will utilize
“artifacts” of cultures past and present to provide students with substantive content in these areas within the humanities. The artifacts provide us the opportunity to
collaborate, research, present, and articulate different points of view as we explore their significance. We will use critical reading of texts, dialogue, and reflective writing
as the means to understand how to form knowledge across disciplinary fields. In the end, students will be able to take this artifact-centered method of inquiry and apply it to
new encounters in any field. Whether they are confronting a visual representation of big data, a computer model, a musical composition, a painting or a sonnet, students will ask provocative, inspiring questions and be offered a range of perspectives.

At the core of this course are filmed presentations by exceptional faculty selected from a range of disciplines in the humanities. Each faculty member will present a sample
artifact from his/her field of study. The lectures will represent these subject areas and following these lectures are a series of discussion groups, small and low-stakes
dialogues and writing exercises, research puzzles, collaborative activities, and a final project.

COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: HUM 201A (INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES)

SLN NUMBER: 15643

5 CREDITS—SATISFIES VLPA REQUIREMENT

OPTIONAL WRITING CREDIT AVAILABLE

ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 120

Please feel free to contact me if I can provide you with
additional information concerning the course.

With best wishes,

Michael C. Shapiro

Divisional Dean of Humanities, College of Arts and Sciences

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“C” or “W” seminar + public school internship for students considering careers working with children and youth

English 298A + English 491B internship = Community Literacy Program combining an on-campus seminar with an internship putting your learning into practice in a high needs setting in public elementary, middle or high school.

In English 298A (5 credits) CLP students meet twice weekly on campus (MW 10:30-12:20) in a seminar focused on building community, understanding equity and difference, working effectively with each other and with K-12 students, exploring central challenges and opportunities for transformative public education, and examining the role of mindfulness, compassion and emotional intelligence in learning. Students gain skill and confidence in using writing, discussion and presentation to develop and share their thinking, and to relate class and internship experience to their academic, personal, civic and career goals. A final career-related writing assignment is taught in collaboration with the UW Career Center. English 298 is open to all UW students, and may be used toward either the “Composition” or “W” requirement.

In English 491B Internship (C/NC; 3 credits), CLP students put what you learn on campus into action, volunteering (@4 hours a week, on a schedule you arrange) at one of our partner public schools. English 491B will appear on your transcript as an internship, may be used toward the field work requirement or as an elective in the Education, Learning
and Society (ELS) Minor, as an elective in both the Education, Communities and Organizations (ECO) Major and the Early Childhood and Family Studies (ECFS) Major, and toward field work requirements in some other departments. English 491B also provides documentation of school-based experience needed for application to Teacher Education programs.

With questions and to request add codes, contact the instructor, Elizabeth Simmons-O’Neill, esoneill@uw.edu
Community Literacy Program flyer.pdf

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Middle East Course & Spring Break Study Tour to Oman & Qatar

The Foster School of Business and the Jackson School of International Studies have partnered to offer a Winter Quarter Course on “Business and Economic Trends in the Middle East” (JSIS 487/587 for 3 credits) that is linked to a 1-credit study tour during spring break to Qatar and Oman.

Students can take just the course, just the study tour, or ideally both! Both the Gulf Study Tour and course are open to graduate and undergraduate students from across campus.

Gulf Study Tour & Middle East Course Details:

See attached flyers. The application will open this week and be linked to our website here.

Information Sessions:
Oct 18, 3:30 – 4:20, PACCAR 456

Nov. 2, 12:30 – 1:20, PACCAR 456

Nov. 13, 3:30 – 4:20, THOMSON 317

The Foster School and the Jackson School are offering a Spring Break Study Tour for 10 days to Qatar and Oman from March 15th-25th, 2018. Earn one-credit and spend spring break learning about key trends that are reconfiguring the economic and business landscape in the Middle East. The study tour will compare and contrast the two countries, examining public policy, diplomacy, economic development, and the overall business climate.

Students will hear directly from policy makers and then visit businesses, oil refineries, ports, and academic institutions. The program seeks to demystify a region that is actively engaged, but poorly understood in the West. Group visits, activities and discussions aim to introduce students to the history of the Middle East, create awareness of the realities and challenges of their economies, and explore everything from supply chain management to foreign direct investment in the Gulf region.

The program cost is $2,400 and includes 1-credit, study abroad fees, housing, in-country transportation, meals, etc. On top of the program fee, students will need to purchase airfare to and from the Middle East.

This study tour is linked to a 3-credit course that is offered during Winter Quarter, called “Economic and Business Trends in the Middle East”. Students can enroll for either a business elective (IBUS 490) or a non-business elective (JSIS 487/ JSIS 587). The course will be listed on the Time Schedule for Winter 2016 under JSIS 587. It is taught by JSIS faculty member and ME expert, Kristian Coates-Ulrich.

Kathleen Hatch Allen
Associate Director, Global Business Center

Foster School of Business

University of Washington

Mackenzie Hall 137, Box 353200
Seattle, WA 98195-3200
206.543.3960 / khatch
foster.uw.edu/centers/gbc/

Mid East Course Flyer 2018.pdf

Qatar and Oman – Gulf Study Tour Flyer.pdf

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International Business Info Sessions

We are pleased to invite you to an information session to learn more about the nationally-ranked Certificate of International Studies in Business (CISB) within the Foster School of Business.

CISB is an intensive supplement to the Bachelor of Arts in business Administration that provides you with a unique global business perspective and gives you a competitive advantage through:

  • Studying or interning abroad in target foreign language.
  • Taking globally-focused business courses and a business specialty.
  • Using foreign language skills in a business setting.
  • Discussing current events with global business professionals.
  • Getting real-world experience in the field.

We are a welcoming community of students and staff dedicated to preparing students for a future in global business. The application for CISB is simple to complete so we encourage you to apply!

Information sessions are held in DEM 233 as follows:

Tues., October 3, 12:30 p.m.

Wed., October 18, 3:30 p.m.

Wed., November 8, 12:30 p.m.

If you are unable to attend an info session, you can still reach out to the CISB Program Adviser Deanna Fryhle at ddf@uw.edu or CISB’s VP of Marketing Raphael Gaultier at raphag@uw.edu to learn more from a student perspective.

See the latest CISB video here.

We hope to see you soon!

Best,
Raphael and Deanna

Deanna Fryhle

Program Adviser

Certificate of International Studies in Business Program (CISB)

Michael G. Foster School of Business

University of Washington

202 Dempsey Hall

UW Box 353223

Seattle, WA  98195-3223

T:  206.543-5985/ F:  206.616-8225

E:  cisb@uw.edu

Web:  www.foster.washington.edu/cisb

Foster_logo_CISB_SB_Purple

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Jackson School series on ‘Trump in the World’ in Fall quarter – no registration necessary

Please see below – the Jackson School’s Fall lecture series on ‘Trump in the World’.

All students are welcome to attend any or all of the talks — and registration for JSIS 478 A is *optional*

Please circulate among your students – many thanks!

Wolf.

WOLFRAM LATSCH D.Phil.

Director of Academic Services
Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

111 Thomson Hall / Box 353650
Seattle, WA 98195-3650
206.543.6001

Make an appointment at http://jsis.washington.edu/advise/

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ESRM 429 Seminar Speaker Schedule Autumn 2017

Come to Kane 220 every Tuesday from 8:30-9:20AM to listen to interesting speakers from the ESRM 429 seminar. The schedule is attached below but subject to change.
capstone poster Summer 2017.pdf

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Marine Biology: space available in the course for all backgrounds

Our fantastic introductory Marine Biology: FISH/OCEAN/BIOL 250 course starts tomorrow and still has open seats for any of you advising students making last-minute changes to their schedule.

The course has 3 credit, lecture-only and 5-credit lab versions

This course requires no prior coursework or background in biology

Suitable for students with an interested in science, but also for students wanting to learn more about marine life in our region

 

Joe Kobayashi

Marine Biology Academic Adviser
University of Washington
Fisheries Sciences Building, Room 114 Box: 355020
206-543-7426
marinebiology.uw.edu

FISH 250 poster.pdf

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VLPA credit available: SLAVIC 490: The Best of Slavic Literature

 

Course Description:

What makes a novel so special that it ends up on the “10 Books I Must Have on a Desert Island” list of generations upon generations of readers across the world? We shall look at a few very special novels and at the relationship between their aesthetic excellence and their long-lasting popularity. Writers include Hemingway, Baldwin, Steinbeck, Hrabal, Krleza, Õnnepalu, and Szabó. While the course may briefly engage some major classic theories of the novel (e.g., by Frye or Bakhtin), it will chiefly be centered on an in-depth study and close reading of the literary works.

Reading List:

Ernest Hemingway: The Sun Also Rises

Miroslav Krleza: On the Edge of Reason

James Baldwin: Giovanni’s Room

John Steinbeck: The Winter of Our Discontent

Bohumil Hrabal: Too Loud a Solitude

Magda Szabó: The Door

Tõnu Õnnepalu: Border State nu Onnepalu: Border State

Eloise M Boyle PhD
Program Coordinator and Undergraduate Adviser
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
University of Washington-Seattle
Box 354335 206.543.6848
slavadv

Check out our web site! slavic.washington.edu
Like us on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter @UwSlavic

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Space Remaining: Undergraduate Research Program courses!

Undergraduate Research Program Autumn Quarter Courses

GEN ST 391 I (1 cred) | SLN: 15698

Research Exposed!: Approaches to Inquiry

Enroll in Research Exposed! for Autumn Quarter (Wednesdays, 12:30-1:20 PM)

Research Exposed! (GEN ST 391 I) is an opportunity to learn about current, exciting research in a wide variety of disciplines, including the process of discovery, how faculty come up with an idea for research, how inquiry is structured in the different disciplines, and how students can become involved in research at UW.

This course may be repeated for credit (1 credit/quarter-3 quarters max); speakers and topics will vary.

Visit the UW Time Schedule entry to register for the course.

GEN ST 391 K (2 cred) | SLN: 15700

Undergraduate Research Intensive for Community College Transfer Students

(Fridays, 12:30-1:50 PM)

The Undergraduate Research Intensive is designed to help incoming transfer students plan and prepare for undergraduate research positions.The course will demystify the research process at UW and provide instruction in research-related skills and resources. All students receive one-on-one advising with Undergraduate Research Program staff and interact with peer researchers.

To request an add code to register for the course, email urp and include the following:

Your full name:

Transfer institution:

UW student number:

Major, intended major, or area(s) of interest

For question, please contact urp.

Research Exposed Aut17.pdf
CC Transfer Intensive Flyer 2017.pdf

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More Room in Formerly Closed Pol S Courses

Political Science has added more room to the following classes that were previously full:

Pol S 317A, US RACE AND ETHN POL
Prof. Sophia Wallace
Lecture TTh 9-1020
Quiz: Fridays at 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 and 12:30

Pol S 361A, US CTS & CIVIL LIB
Prof. Megan Francis
Lecture MW 12-120
Quiz: Thursdays at 8:30, 9:30, 11:30, 12:30

Pol S 367A, COMP LAW AND COURTS
Prof. Rachel Cichowski
Lecture: TTh 1130-1250
Quiz: Fridays at 8:30, 9:30, 10:30, 11:30, 12:30

All three classes count for the I&S requirement and are open without restriction. All three instructors are truly outstanding.

Meera E. Roy
Director of Academic Services
Department of Political Science
Box 353530
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-3530
(206) 543-9456 FAX: (206) 685-2146

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