Category Archives: grad

APRIL Sustainaiblity Professional Development Program

APRIL Sustainability Professional Development Programme (ASPDP) is an 18-month long management-trainee programme run by APRIL Group. APRIL is one of the largest pulp and paper manufacturing companies in the world, with plantations and manufacturing operations in Riau, Indonesia.

The ASPDP programme is divided into three rotations, each covering different roles within the APRIL sustainability department, with mentoring from senior management provided throughout the course. Following the completion of the programme, candidates are eligible for fast track promotion, depending on their performance.

We recently opened applications for the 2019 intake. Applications are open to graduate students who have prior working experience (including internships), and who preferably have some demonstrable knowledge and understanding of the forestry, environment, and sustainability sectors.

For more information, please visit our program page here. I also encourage you to watch the video of our 2018 batch here.

ASPDP 2019.pdf

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Soden-Trueblood Graduate Student Fellowship announcement

Here’s a great opportunity for a graduate student to receive a fellowship working with the University of Washington Press.

http://uwhires.admin.washington.edu/ENG/candidates/default.cfm?szCategory=jobprofile&jobhistory=1&szOrderID=166248

InternshipAnnouncement-2019.pdf

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Fish and Wildlife Ecology Seminar – Monday (4/8/19) 3pm

Christopher Schell (Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Urban Ecology, University of Washington, Tacoma) will be presenting Monday (4/8/19) from 3-4pm in the Physics and Astronomy Tower, Room C520.

Title: Nothing to Fear: Uncovering the mechanisms that mediate fearlessness in coyotes

Abstract:

Reduced fear in wildlife is becoming an extensive phenomenon across the globe. Justifiably so, as a minimum level of habituation may be necessary to survive rapid, human-driven landscape changes. However, fearlessness beyond a certain threshold may increase the potential for human-wildlife conflict. Investigating the mechanisms that underpin human-directed fearlessness may therefore be a significant tool for diagnosing and mitigating conflict before incidents occur, increasing the basic and applied potential of such research endeavors. In this talk, Dr. Schell will detail the potential processes that contribute to the emergence of boldness behaviors in coyotes (Canis latrans), a widespread urban-adapted mammal. The talk will also explore the varied work of the Grit City Carnivore Project, a research collaborative dedicated to uncovering the patterns and processes by which urban carnivores navigate urbanization in the Pacific Northwest.

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Chris Schell is an Assistant Professor of Urban Ecology at the University of Washington, Tacoma, and principal investigator of the Grit City Carnivore Project. Dr. Schell’s research integrates evolutionary theory with ecological application to disentangle the processes accentuating human-carnivore conflict. Specifically, his interests lie in understanding the physiological mechanisms and anthropogenic drivers that may contribute to fearless behavior in urban carnivores. His research is uniquely tied to the community: urban ecology is inherently a synergy of anthropogenic forces and natural processes. Hence, he often works closely with nondominant communities (e.g. ethnic and racial minorities), wildlife managers, cultural institutions, and philanthropic organizations to help foster mutually enriching relationships among people and wildlife. Chris received his B.A. in Psychology from Columbia University (2009) and his masters and Ph.D in Evolutionary Biology from the University of Chicago (2015).

Zoom Meeting information:

If you are unable to attend in person, here is the Zoom meeting link to attend remotely:

https://washington.zoom.us/j/983655668

For information on how to join a UW Zoom Meeting please visit: https://itconnect.uw.edu/connect/phones/conferencing/zoom-video-conferencing/join-meeting/

Upcoming FWE seminars:

Date: Speaker:
4/1/19 Devin Johnson
4/8/19 Christopher Schell
4/15/19 Leslie New
4/22/19 Tara Chestnut
4/29/19 Daniel Schindler
5/6/19 Correigh Greene
5/13/19 Lily van Eeden and Carol Bogezi
5/20/19 Dee Boersma
5/27/19 Memorial Day
6/3/19 Jim Thorson

For more info visit the Washington Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit’s webpage: https://depts.washington.edu/wacfwru/category/seminar-series/

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International Development and Nonprofit Management Certificates: Application Deadline 4/14/19

The Evans School is accepting applications for the International Development and Nonprofit Management Certificate programs. All current UW graduate students from any campus are welcome to apply, as long as they will be enrolled for the duration of the 2019-20 academic year.

The application deadline for both programs is Friday, April 14, 2019.

The International Development Policy and Management Certificate program (IDCP) offers students a foundation for addressing complex questions of poverty and development. The certificate requires that students complete 9 credits of core course material and two electives that cover areas or methods focused on international development. The program handout is attached.

Application Information

Contact: devcert

The Nonprofit Management Certificate program (NMCP) gives students the tools and framework needed to meet the increasing challenges facing the nonprofit sector today. The program provides students with fundamental knowledge of the nonprofit sector through one core course and four elective courses. The program handout is attached.

Application Information

Contact: nmcp

IDCP Handout 2019-20_FINAL.pdf

NMCP Handout_2019-20.pdf

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M.S. opportunity in human dimensions of forested landscapes

Funded M.S. opportunity in human dimensions and landscape ecology of forest management…

I seek an individual interested in pursuing a Masters of Science degree in partnership with an interdisciplinary project focused on forest management and landowner decision-making. There is some flexibility in the specific thesis topic direction, which will be determined based on the interests of the selected applicant. Potential examples may include decision-making by various forest management stakeholder groups (e.g., forestland and small woodlot owners; tree wardens; public vs. private vs. non-profit land managers), community outreach, or application of existing spatial social science and land cover data to decision-support tools and forest management policy. The assistantship is available through the Department of Natural Resources & the Environment at University of Connecticut. Start date is August 2019.

Applicants should have: 1) a background in natural resources, forest management, human dimensions of natural resources, and/or landscape ecology, 2) interest in applied research focused on the integration of human dimensions of natural resources data within an interdisciplinary landscape context, and 3) the ability to work both independently and as part of a research team. The student will be expected to present research results at professional conferences, publish research results in peer-reviewed scientific outlets, and pursue extramural funding to supplement their assistantship, as appropriate. A working knowledge of GIS is preferred but not essential.

Interested students are encouraged to send: 1) a cover letter describing their professional background, relevant research experience and interests, career goals, and reasons for seeking a Masters degree, 2) names and contact information for three references, 3) a current curriculum vitae, and 4) copies of transcripts and GRE scores directly to me (Anita Morzillo; anita.morzillo) as a single *.pdf document.

Unofficial copies of transcripts and GRE scores are sufficient for initial contact. GRE scores must be less than five years old, and are required for acceptance into the program. Potential students must have received a GPA equivalent to a 3.0/4.0 in the last 90 term (or 60 semester) hours of their Bachelors program. Do not submit materials to the UConn Graduate School at this time.

Application review will begin 15 April (2019), and continue until a candidate is selected.

Interested individuals may learn more about my research program at http://anitamorzillo.weebly.com/

Further information about the UConn Department of Natural Resources and the Environment may be found at http://www.nrme.uconn.edu/

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Requesting a letter of recommendation Advice by Michael Ernst

I thought this document was very detailed and would be useful to many of you.

Requesting a letter of recommendation

by Michael Ernst

Advancement in your professional career (such as obtaining a job or fellowship) often requires that you obtain letters of recommendation from previous colleagues, supervisors, etc. In general, letters tend to be more important in academic jobs than for industrial ones. You shouldn’t feel that you are imposing when you ask for such letters: the letter-writers recognize that it is part of their professional responsibility. However, you should also do everything in your power to ease the burden on your references…..

https://homes.cs.washington.edu/~mernst/advice/request-recommendation.html

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2019 Northwest Horticultural Society Miller Scholarship

The Northwest Horticultural Society is pleased to announce that we are now accepting applications for the 2019 Elisabeth Carey Miller Scholarship in Horticulture, which is for UW graduate students in horticulture and related disciplines including Environmental and Forest Sciences. The attached documents outline the application process and the award amount for this year. Applications are due on May 3, 2019.

2019 NHS Scholarship Announcement.pdf

NHS Scholarship for 2019 FINALdoc.pdf

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ESS 521: Advanced Geospatial Analysis with Python for the Earth Sciences – A Survey of Programming Ap plications and Numerical Methods

SEFS graduate students,

Please consider this Geospatial Analysis course for Spring. The course is taught in Earth and Spaces Sciences, but may be of interest to some of you. It includes basic instruction in Python, a programming language used with ArcGIS and for other purposes. Flyer attached.

ESS 521 spr2019 flyer.pdf

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March 15 final presentations for Digital Storytelling of Holistic Knowledge to Contemporary Environmental Problems

SEFS students,

Please consider attending the presentations for Digital Storytelling of Holistic Knowledge to Contemporary Environmental Problems on March 15th. The event will be held at the Samuel E. Kelly Ethnic Cultural Center at 1:00 PM. These presentations are the result of a course taught by Kristiina Vogt and they will feature expert moderators and audience questions. Flyer attached.

ESRM490 Final Presentations.v5.pdf

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Fish and Wildlife Ecology Seminar – Monday (3/11/19) 3pm

Subject: Fish and Wildlife Ecology Seminar – Monday (3/11/19) 3pm

Peter Mahoney, Ph.D. (Postdoctoral Researcher, Prugh Lab, SEFS, UW) will be presenting Monday (3/11/19) from 3-4 pm in the Physics and Astronomy Tower, Room C520.

Title: How spatially explicit individual-based models can inform conservation above and below the waterline


Abstract:

Individual-based models (IBM; aka Agent-based models) are increasingly utilized to explore complex questions or problems in ecology. Such growth in the application of IBM is facilitated by abundant long-term and data-rich study systems, which are often required to parameterize such detailed models. The talk will provide a brief history of IBM in ecology and introduce applications from both fisheries and wildlife-focused research. I will highlight my own experiences working with IBM in a wildlife conservation setting and discuss the motivations and outcome of our research. Specifically, I will discuss the genetic and demographic consequences of a small, isolated population of mountain lions in California, and the conservation threats to the endangered Algonquin wolf associated with a 3-species hybrid zone in central Ontario.

Peter a conservation ecologist with a keen interest in research pertaining to animal movement and space use, particularly as they relate to multi-species interactions and predator-prey processes. Peter is currently a researcher with the Animals on the Move team, a NASA-funded ABoVE collaboration, tasked with developing insights into how climate change and variability (past and future) will influence movements and space use in arctic and boreal forest vertebrates, such as Dall sheep, moose, wolves, and brown bears.

Zoom Meeting information:

If you are unable to attend in person, here is the Zoom meeting link to attend remotely:

https://washington.zoom.us/j/651856705

For information on how to join a UW Zoom Meeting please visit: https://itconnect.uw.edu/connect/phones/conferencing/zoom-video-conferencing/join-meeting/

Upcoming FWE seminars:

Date Speaker
Monday’s 3-4 pm
1/7/19 Scott Pearson
1/14/19 Eric Regehr
1/28/19 Tom Quinn/Aaron Wirsing
2/4/19 Cancelled (Rescheduled 3/18 John Marzluff)
2/11/19 Cancelled (Rescheduled 5/6 Correigh Greene)
2/25/19 Tasha Gownaris
3/4/19 Neala Kendall
3/11/19 Peter Mahoney
3/18/19 John Marzluff

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Fish and Wildlife Ecology Seminar – Monday (3/4/19) 3pm

Neala Kendall (Research Scientist, Statewide Quantitative Synthesis and Reporting Unit, Fish Program, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife) will be presenting Monday (3/4/19) from 3-4 pm in the Physics and Astronomy Tower, Room C520.

Title: Density-dependent factors shaping salmon and steelhead survival and life history


Abstract:

In Washington State and beyond, we want higher numbers of salmon and steelhead for conservation and recreation. Salmon and steelhead have been highly impacted by a multitude of factors over the last century, and recovering them has been challenging. Density dependence is an important factor that can influence survival and life history of salmon and steelhead and should be considered when taking management actions. In this talk, I will discuss two recent projects where considering density dependence was helpful. First, I’ll discuss factors, including intraspecific density dependence, related to the life history strategies anadromy and residency in steelhead and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) across their Pacific Rim range. Second I’ll talk about an ongoing project asking the question: in the past, when more hatchery Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) have been released into the Salish Sea, has there been an associated increase in the number of hatchery Chinook salmon that have survived their migration in the ocean and returned as adults. We consider the abundance of both juvenile Chinook and pink salmon (O. gorbuscha) as density dependence has appeared to play a role in shaping survival rates.

Dr. Neala Kendall is an evolutionary conservation biologist with a focus on Pacific salmon. In

her current role at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife she works on statewide

salmonid issues, data synthesis, and science coordination and communication.

Zoom Meeting information:

If you are unable to attend in person, here is the Zoom meeting link to attend remotely:

https://washington.zoom.us/j/602303823

For information on how to join a UW Zoom Meeting please visit: https://itconnect.uw.edu/connect/phones/conferencing/zoom-video-conferencing/join-meeting/

Upcoming FWE seminars:

Date Speaker
Monday’s 3-4 pm
1/7/19 Scott Pearson
1/14/19 Eric Regehr
1/28/19 Tom Quinn/Aaron Wirsing
2/4/19 Cancelled (Rescheduled 3/18 John Marzluff)
2/11/19 Cancelled (Rescheduled 5/6 Correigh Greene)
2/25/19 Tasha Gownaris
3/4/19 Neala Kendall
3/11/19 Peter Mahoney
3/18/19 John Marzluff

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UW Master of Science in Technology Innovation Information Session, March 4th, 6- 7pm

Want to learn more about the UW Master of Science in Technology Innovation (MSTI) and Global Innovation (GIX) Dual Degree programs?

Design. Build. Launch.

From smart homes to smart health, computing technologies are transforming our daily lives and powering innovation across the globe. Lean how to design, build and launch the smart and connected solutions of the future.

Through intensive courses in design thinking, technology development and entrepreneurship, the Master of Science in Technology Innovation teaches the skills needed to take an innovation from concept to development and on to launch. For students interested in developing a global perspective on technology innovation, we offer a dual degree that combines the UW MSTI with a Master of Engineering in Data Science & Information Technology at Tsinghua University in China. You can learn more about GIX here

For more information, please attend one of our upcoming information sessions. You will get to learn more about the program from MSTI staff and students.

When: Monday, March 4 at 6pm

Where: UWT, Cherry Parkes 206C

RSVP here

Questions? Please email msti

UWTacomaCherryParkesMSTI_2019Flyer.pdf

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Masters of Forest Resources- Native Americans in Forest Business Management Fellowship-Tuition + Stipend

Subject: Masters of Forest Resources- Native Americans in Forest Business Management Fellowship-Tuition + Stipend

The University of Georgia encourages that ALL Majors apply.

Past program cohorts have included majors in business and political science
www.itcnet.org

Master of Forest Resources in Forest Business Management.pdf

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SEFS 521 C Remote Sensing and Earth Observation

SEFS graduate students,

Please consider the attached flyer for SEFS 521 C in Spring quarter. This current topics course will cover Remote Sensing and Earth Observation including satellite remote sensing. Note that there is a Friday morning computer lab not included in the Time Schedule entry.

Course Flyer2019.pdf

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University of Oxford – Summer School + Scholarships

Our Enterprise and the Environment Summer School will take place from 30 June – 12 July 2019 at the University of Oxford and is intended for undergraduate and masters students passionate about environmental change. The course typically attracts a global spread of 35-40 attendees from a diverse mix of academic disciplines and will include teaching across subjects such as corporate sustainability, environmental economics and policy, the future of transport, water markets and risk, and the renewable energy transition. There are x3 scholarships available which will cover the course fees in full. I have attached a copy of the course brochure and can also advise that more details are available on our website here: https://www.smithschool.ox.ac.uk/courses/summer-school/.

Brochure – University of Oxford – Summer School 2019.pdf

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The 18th Symposium on Systems Analysis in Forest Resources – Puerto Varas, Chile, March 3-7, 2019

Colleagues,

This is your last chance to register for this Symposium at the early bird rate. To be held in Chile’s Lake District on March 3-7, 2019, this meeting should be of interest to those working on systems approaches to forest resources management. Last minute abstracts for oral presentations are also welcome as we had a few cancellations. Here is the Symposium website, now updated with the detailed technical program, and with info about the optional field trip to Lagos Todos los Santos & Llanquihue: http://www.ssafr2019.cl

If you have any questions, please let me know. The Symposium is partially sponsored by our School’s Precision Forestry Coop: https://sites.uw.edu/uwpfc

Best regards,

Sándor

Sándor F. Tóth

Donald J. & Robert G. McLachlan Associate Professor

School of Environmental & Forest Sciences

University of Washington, Seattle

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Fish and Wildlife Ecology Seminar – Monday (2/4/19) 3pm

John Marzluff (UW Professor) will be presenting Monday (2/4/19) from 3-4 pm in the Physics and Astronomy Tower, Room C520.

Title: Of ravens and wolves.


Abstract:
Being scavengers on the kills of carnivores, ravens have a close evolutionary history with wolves. I will review this relationship and the habits of ravens in general as I set the scene for a new research project just begun in Yellowstone National Park. This project includes the tagging of ravens with transmitters monitored by the International Space Station to understand the relationships between individual ravens and specific wolf packs. Our goal is to better understand how ravens use resources provided by wolves and those provided by people (tourists and local communities). I will discuss our recent research documenting how snowfall may mediate the tradeoff ravens make between scavenging from wolves and people and present a first look at data from one raven that regularly switched between begging from tourists, scavenging from hunters, and following wolves. Based on these pilot data, I will discuss our plans for research next year.

Dr. Marzluff is the James W. Ridgeway Professor of Forest Sciences at the University of Washington. He, along with his students in the Avian Conservation Laboratory study how humans affect birds through habitat fragmentation and increased urbanization. He is especially fond of corvids.

Zoom Meeting information:

If you are unable to attend in person, here is the Zoom meeting link to attend remotely:

https://washington.zoom.us/j/583824851

For information on how to join a UW Zoom Meeting please visit: https://itconnect.uw.edu/connect/phones/conferencing/zoom-video-conferencing/join-meeting/

Upcoming FWE seminars:

Date Speaker
Monday’s 3-4 pm
1/7/19 Scott Pearson
1/14/19 Eric Regehr
1/28/19 Tom Quinn/Aaron Wirsing
2/4/19 John Marzluff
2/11/19 Correigh Greene
2/25/19 Tasha Gownaris
3/4/19 Neala Kendall
3/11/19 Peter Mahoney

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Join Us: Student Roundtable on Dams in the PNW

Are you looking for an evening with food, drinks, and interesting conversations? Are you curious about research on freshwater dams globally and locally?

If so, come join students and faculty from multiple disciplines and departments on Thursday, February 12, 5:00 – 7:00 PM for a lively discussion on how dams feature in students’ research and the role of dams in the future. Students are encouraged to give a 3 minute lightning talk, but you do not have to give a talk to participate.More details and an RSVP link are listed below.

Hope to see you there!

Join us for the next exciting event in our Freshwater Exploration Series.

View the web version of this message

University of Washington
FRESHWATER INITIATIVE

You’re Invited!
Freshwater Exploration Series, Winter 2019
Learn More https://explore.uw.edu/rs/131-AQO-225/images/arrow-purple.png
February

12

2019

What: Freshwater Exploration Series: Student Roundtable on Dams in the Pacific Northwest

When: Tuesday, February 12, 2019, 5:00-7:00 pm

Where: Communications Building, Room 202

Join us for the second event in the 2018-2019 Freshwater Exploration Series: Dams in the Pacific Northwest. The Freshwater Exploration Series is hosted by the UW Freshwater Initiative and the UW Simpson Center for Humanities. This roundtable will include:

  1. Lightning talks about how dams are featured in students’ research,
  2. A brief discussion of Ho et al. (2017): The future of dams in the United States of America and an excerpt from Rita Wong’s Undercurrent,
  3. Planning for the Spring 2019 panel event.

Students from ALL disciplines are invited to give 3-minute lightning talks about how dams or the impact of dams feature in their research. Giving a talk is not required to participate in this event.

We will also be identifying questions, issues, and perspectives that we would like to address in a Spring 2019 panel event with academic and industry experts.

Food and drinks will be served.

LEARN MORE https://explore.uw.edu/rs/131-AQO-225/images/arrow-purple.png
RSVP https://explore.uw.edu/rs/131-AQO-225/images/arrow-purple.png
Reading Materials
A hydropower plant on the edge of a river

Future of Dams in the US

Ho et al. (2017) explore whether more dams are needed in the US when climate change projections suggest more hydrologic extremes.
DOWNLOAD https://explore.uw.edu/rs/131-AQO-225/images/arrow-purple.png

Rita Wong’s Undercurrent

Rita Wong’s Undercurrent reflects on the power and sacredness of water, which largely goes underappreciated.
DOWNLOAD https://explore.uw.edu/rs/131-AQO-225/images/arrow-purple.png
A stream meanders through a forest
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Restoration Positions with ICF

Restoration Engineer UW Version.docx

RestorationDesigner UW Version.docx

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OWRC Writing Circle Networking Event for Graduate Students – Jan. 29, 3:30pm

The Odegaard Writing and Research Center (OWRC) is co-hosting a writing circle networking event with GPSS and the Research Commons on Tuesday, January 29 at 3:30pm in the Research Commons that helps grads connect and form writing circles for their projects. A reception with refreshments will follow.

Writing circles can be a valuable way for grad students working on dissertations, theses, manuscripts for publication, and the like to support one another in their work and make time in their busy schedules for their writing.

OWRC – Writing Circle Poster Version 2 (1).pdf

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