Category Archives: ug

The Izaak Walton League of America National Conservation Scholarship

The mission of the Izaak Walton League of America (IWLA) is to conserve, restore, and promote the sustainable use and enjoyment of our natural resources. Part of IWLA’s longstanding mission includes education — Thus the formation of the IWLA National Conservation Scholarship program.

Each year the non-profit, membership organization offers two $2,500 scholarships to qualified natural resource undergraduates, involved in:

  • Environmental science/engineering/education
  • Natural resource management
  • Forestry
  • Wildlife
  • Fisheries
  • Parks and recreation
  • Other natural and earth sciences

Qualifications

IWLA National Conseration Scholarship may be presented to no more than two undergraduate students in the United States, one in each of the following categories. Each scholarship category includes up to $2,500, an engraved plaque, and a one-year IWLA student membership (new or renewed).

  • Category 1: previous IWLA Chapter/Division Scholarship Recipient
  • Category 2: child/grandchild of-or-a current IWLA member

Eligibility

Previous IWLA National Conservation Scholarship recipients are ineligible. You may apply for only one category per year. If not selected, but still eligible, you may apply during the second year.

Application Deadline

The application must be postmarked no later than May 15th.

For more information, please visit: http://www.iwla.org/scholarship

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Space Available in MICROM courses

There are currently spaces in the following Microbiology courses. There are no major restrictions, just pre-requisites. Please pass along to students if it applies!

MICROM 411 – Bacterial Genetics – PR: BIOL 200 and Organic Chemistry

Molecular genetics: description of fundamental genetic processes such as mutation, repair, genetic exchange, recombination, and gene expression. Use of genetic strategies to analyze complex biological processes. Focuses on prokaryotic organisms.

MICROM 431L – Prokaryotic Recombinant DNA techniques – PR: BIOL 200 or MICROM 301

Laboratory course emphasizing concepts and techniques/methodologies in recombinant DNA research employing bacteria and their viruses. Topics and experiments/demonstrations include genomic and plasmid DNA isolation, restriction mapping, cloning, transposon mutagenesis, sequencing, and Western and Southern blotting

MICROM 442 – Medical Bacteriology – PR: BIOL 200

Medically important bacterial pathogens are discussed in terms of the clinical, therapeutic, and epidemiological aspects of diseases caused by them, molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis and their identification in the clinical laboratory

MICROM 450 – Molecular Biology of Viruses – PR:BIOL 200

Introduction to the molecular biology of viruses and virus-host relationships. Designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students in the biological sciences. Coverage includes bacterial and animal viruses, with an emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of viral gene expression and regulation

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Summer Employment Opportunity for Students

Sierra Pacific Industries, a company in both California and Washington, is looking to hire students for the 2019 summer as botanical technicians performing surveys for rare plants on forestlands in northern California. Students can learn more about the company at www.spi-ind.com. If you have any questions, please contact Stephanie Puentes at the email or phone below.

Our flyer can be viewed and printed from http://spi-ind.com/Careers/Details/33248

~Stephanie Puentes

Sierra Pacific Industries

Botanist, Wildlife and Botany Department

(530) 378-8190

spuentes@spi-ind.com

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Noble Research Institute Accepting Applications for Summer Agriculture Internship

Noble Research Institute Accepting Applications for Summer Agriculture Internship

DEADLINE: February 6, 2019

The Lloyd Noble Scholars in Agriculture program offers students the opportunity to work alongside agricultural professionals at one of the nation’s foremost agricultural research organizations. Scholars work forty hours a week and will earn approximately $4,800 during the two-and-a half month program.

To Apply

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Beinecke Scholarship for juniors planning for graduate study in Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences

Scholarship opportunity available for undergraduates planning ahead for graduate studies in arts, humanities and social science fields. The Beinecke Scholarship hopes to reduce financial barriers to graduate study for academically strong “juniors” (i.e. those planning graduation between December 2019 and August 2020). Freshmen and sophomores may also appreciate learning about this opportunity now for application in future years. Eligibility details are included below.

Beinecke Scholarship for juniors in arts, humanities & social science fields

The Beinecke Scholarship seeks to encourage and enable highly motivated students to pursue opportunities available to them and to be courageous in the selection of a graduate course of study in the arts, humanities and social sciences. The scholarship provides $34,000 for a research-focused master’s or doctoral program in the arts, humanities or social sciences to juniors (based on graduation date) of exceptional ability, achievement, and who have financial need.

Students must be nominated to compete for this scholarship, and the UW is able to nominate one student per year to compete for this national award. Students from all 3 campuses are welcome to apply for nomination.

If you are considering graduate studies in an arts, humanities or social science field, have a passion for that field, and financial need, consider applying! Each scholar receives $4,000 immediately prior to entering graduate school and an additional $30,000 while attending graduate school. There are no geographic restrictions on the use of the scholarship, and recipients are allowed to supplement the award with other scholarships, assistantships and research grants.

UW application deadline: Jan. 8, 2019, 11:59pm

UW application and nomination information: https://expd.uw.edu/expo/scholarships/beinecke

UW online application: https://expo.uw.edu/expo/apply/523

Eligibility:

To be eligible for this scholarship, a student must:

· Have demonstrated superior standards of intellectual ability, scholastic achievement and personal promise during their undergraduate career.

· Be a college junior pursuing a bachelor’s degree during the 2018-2019 academic year. “Junior” means a student who plans to continue full-time undergraduate study and who expects to receive a baccalaureate degree between December 2019 and August 2020.

· Plan to enter a research-focused master’s or doctoral program in the arts, humanities or social sciences. Students in the social sciences who plan to pursue graduate study in neuroscience should not apply for a Beinecke Scholarship. Also, students who plan to pursue professional school programs that emphasize skills and practical analysis over theory and research (such as law, business, education, architecture, journalism, clinical psychology, social work, etc.), are not competitive for selection at the national level.

· Be a United States citizen, or a United States national from American Samoa or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

· Have a documented history of receiving need-based financial aid during their undergraduate years. Primary evidence of meeting this criterion is a student’s history of receiving need-based institutional, state or federal grants-in-aid. An institutional financial aid officer will be required to complete a Financial Data Sheet certifying that the student meets this criterion. During the selection process, the amount of financial need will be one of the factors considered with preference being given to candidates for whom the awarding of a scholarship would significantly increase the likelihood of the student’s being able to attend graduate school.

Information Sessions:

To learn more about this opportunity and the UW application and nomination process, please attend a Beinecke Scholarship Information Session:

· Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018, 12:30pm, MGH 136

· Monday, Nov. 19, 2018, 5:30-6:30pm, online via Zoom

· Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018, 4:30pm, MGH 136

· RSVP to attend at https://expo.uw.edu/expo/rsvp/event/238, though drop-ins are always welcome.

Please feel free to contact Robin Chang in the UW Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships & Awards (robinc, 206-543-2603, MGH 171) with questions or concerns.

Beinecke Scholarship.pdf

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Winter and Spring 2019 English Department courses for future teachers

The English Department offers courses each quarter of interest to students considering careers in teaching and related fields. English 471: The Theory and Practice of Teaching Writing, will be offered next in Winter 2019, and the Community Literacy Program (English 298/498/491) will be offered in Spring 2019.

These courses fulfill a range of UW requirements, as well as requirements for the ELS Minor and for application to Masters in Teaching/Teacher Education programs. These courses all offer students the opportunity to put on-campus learning into practice through service-learning internships in our partner “high needs” public school programs.

Winter 2019: English471: The Theory and Practice of Teaching Writing (TuTh 1:30-3:20) VLPA; W option). In Winter 2019, English 471 will be taught by Mandy Macklin. English 471 reviews the research in composition studies, and the core debates and politics that have shaped the practice, teaching, and study of writing. The course will also examine the assumptions that guide varied approaches, and consideration of whose interests they serve, so that all members of the class can become more self-reflective readers, writers, and teachers. Coursework will include keeping a reading journal, conducting a brief teaching ethnography, preparing a bibliography and curriculum design presentation, and creating a teaching portfolio.

English 471 will have an optional service-learning internship component through which students work in a local K-12 classroom (three to four hours each week) as tutors, mentors, and writing coaches. Those who opt to do service learning will also have the option to register for additional credit hours of English 491 if they choose. For those who participate, the service learning in this course will fulfill 30-40 of the observation hours required for application to the Masters in Teaching/Teacher Education programs. Add codes will be available for English 491 during the first week of classes. For more information about service-learning in English 471 contact the English Department’s service-learning coordinator, Prof. Elizabeth Simmons-O’Neill, esoneill.

Spring 2019: Community Literacy Program (MW 10:30-12:20; C or W; capstone for English majors). In Spring 2019, the Community Literacy Program will be taught by CLP director Elizabeth Simmons-O’Neill. Community Literacy Program links a 5 credit on-campus seminar (English 298 or 498) with service-learning internships in our “high needs” partner public school programs (English 491). Assignments include a service-learning journal, short writing about course texts and themes, a collaborative presentation about students’ shared work in a partner school, and an individually designed research project, for which research instruction is provided. The instructor meets with students to discuss drafts and revisions of their major projects. Central course goals include testing theory in practice, engaging in effective, reflective work with public school students and teachers, and learning more about both our own writing and learning processes, and the impact of CLP on our academic, career, civic and personal goals.

Community Literacy Program provides a capstone opportunity for English Majors, and an opportunity for students from other majors and at all stages of their UW careers to complete “C” and “W” requirements. CLP is also a great way for students considering teaching careers to get crucial school-based experience in “high needs” schools, and the hours completed may be used toward the field work requirement in the Education, Learning and Society minor, as well as observation hours required for application to the UW Masters in Teaching Program. There are no prerequisites. Add codes (all periods) will be available from the instructor beginning in February: esoneill.

Feel free to be in touch with questions related to these courses, or to the English Department’s public school service-learning partnerships.

Elizabeth Simmons-O’Neill
Director, Community Literacy Program
Associate Director, Expository Writing Program

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Hiring OWRC Writing Center Tutors for 2018-2019 (Applications due 11/19)

The Odegaard Writing & Research Center (OWRC) is now hiring new writing consultants for Winter and Spring quarters. If you or your colleagues know someone who might be both interested in and qualified to apply for work as a peer tutor at the OWRC, please feel free to share the following link (https://depts.washington.edu/owrc/hiring) and encourage them to apply on Handshake (#2139717). Preference will be given to candidates graduating in June 2020 or later.

The OWRC is an interdisciplinary writing and research center that aims to support UW students, staff, and faculty on their diverse writing and research projects through one-to-one tutoring sessions, group tutoring sessions, workshops, and other programs.

Our tutors are undergraduate and graduate students from a wide range of academic fields, and we provide a rich learning environment for writers and tutors alike. We consistently hear from tutors that their work here is challenging and transformative. The OWRC is a vibrant learning community that provides tutors with ongoing training, varied professional experiences, and a welcoming work environment.

Complete application instructions are posted on our website; the deadline is Monday, November 19 at 5:00 pm. We also encourage applicants to to bring their materials to the OWRC and discuss them with our current tutors—just make an appointment and come by.

http://depts.washington.edu/owrc

OWRC Peer Tutor Job Announcement_Wi19.pdf

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Introducing The Levin Firm Bi-yearly $1,000 Scholarships

The Levin Firm would like to invite students to partake in our Spring 2019 Bi-yearly $1,000 Scholarship.

At the Levin Firm, we strongly feel that a great education is one of the most important benefits for young people today. For this reason, we are pleased to announce that our firm is offering a $1,000.00 college scholarship to the winner of our essay competition.

All students who plan on pursuing a course of study at a college or university for the school year of 2019 are encouraged to apply. The scholarship deadline is February 15th, 2019.

Our scholarship page contains all the eligibility requirements and may be found here: https://www.levininjuryfirm.com/scholarship/

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STAT 180: Introduction to Data Science

New course STAT 180 Introduction to Data Science in Winter 19. The course has essentially no prerequisites and is suitable for freshmen.

Intro to DS brochureV3 Winter 2019.pdf

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“Which Public Health Degree Is Right for Me?” 11/29/18 Event

Are you considering a public health graduate degree? The Department of Health Services trains students for influential careers in public health practice and research, health administration, health promotion, and health policy. Would you like to learn more about the types of graduate degrees we offer and what makes them unique?

The Department of Health Services invites you to attend our “Which Public Health Degree is Right For Me?” session –

Which Public Health Degree Is Right for Me?

Date/Time: November 29, 2018; 5:30-7:30pm

Location: UW Bothell campus, UW1-280

Event Description: Join us for a panel led by graduate students in our COPHP, MPH, MS, MHA, and MHIHIM programs, followed by small group break-out sessions. Pizza and beverages will be served!

RSVP link: https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/hservask/358394

We hope to see you there!

Which Degree Flyer_Autumn 2018_UWB_tinyurl.pdf

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2019 UW Neurological Surgery Student Summer Program

The UW Neurological Surgery Summer Student Program just opened applications for next summer’s program. The link to applications is found on our website – https://depts.washington.edu/nsssp/.

Attached is a program overview as well.

Program Overview NSSSP 2019.docx

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Museology Graduate Program Info Meeting Nov 30

If you have students interested in pursuing careers in museums or cultural organizations, please share this invitation to the Museology program’s Information Meeting on November 30.

UW Museology Graduate Program – Prospective Student Events

  • Information Meeting. November 30, 3–4 p.m. (Reception to follow). UW Tower, Ravenna Training Room
  • Online Information Meeting. December 13, 3–4 p.m.

Please join us to learn about UW’s master’s program in museology, or museum studies. At our information meeting, you will have a chance to talk with faculty, students and alumni about how this flexible, dynamic interdisciplinary degree can help you use museums to build stronger communities. If you are interested in applying by our January 15 application deadline, come to the meeting to find out more about find out more about how you can put together a strong application.

To RSVP to an information meeting, please visit our events page. For more information about our application, please visit our application page.

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STUDIO- Community Service Learning and VLPA/I&S credit Opportunity

STUDIO is an exciting opportunity for undergraduate students to get involved in the local Seattle community by working with youths in after-school program. It counts as VLPA or I&S credits for undergraduate students.

Past undergrads have said that it was one of the best experiences that they had in UW, because they felt a sense of belongingness learning together with youths and other undergraduate students from diverse backgrounds. I attached flyers, and videos including course registration information. Undergraduates do not have to be STEM major to participate in STUDIO. Below is our video about the program.

https://youtu.be/ZNNvrA-Upp0

Here is the website that introduces people and organization involved in STUDIO. https://www.studionhwa.org/

MentorRecruitmentFlyer_Winter_2018-2019.docx

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B E 220: Cities, Health, and Well-Being

B E 220 Cities, Health, and Well-Being

SLN 10944

Winter 2019 | Tues/Thurs 3:30-4:50

GWN 301 | 3 credits | I&S | SLN 10944

BE220 explores how cities contribute to health and well-being, including security, basic needs, positive social relations, freedom, choices and opportunities. It evaluates an urban future and debates strategies for rehabilitating existing cities and building new, sustainable ones. Lecture and group discussions.

PDF attached.

For additional information contact drbobm@uw.edu

BE220_2019_poster.pdf

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ENGL 285 (winter, VLPA): Writers on Writing

Interested in the writing and publishing process (how a poem gets to press, how a novel is written, how a writer comes up with that most beautiful/memorable sentence)? Then this class if for you! Every week a different published writer will talk about their experience and answer your questions.

For more information, please see the attachment below.

WoW info sheet.docx

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Spots still available! Democracy through Dialogue dinner

We believe that now, more than ever, we must engage in dialogue with people who have different beliefs in order to broaden our perspectives and generate understanding. The Democracy through Dialogue series was created for this reason. This program welcomes UW undergraduates of any background or political perspective to participate in a facilitated, intimate, lively and productive dialogue over dinner about critical issues of our time.

Rolling Application – please apply!

Online application found at: www.uw.edu/carlson/dialogue

Fall Dialogues:

  • November 13th, 5-8pm
  • November 19th, 5-8pm

Dinner is provided. The event is free of cost.

Fall Topics:

Free Speech: Nonviolent Protest

Education for All: Conduct & Discipline

Democracy through Dialogue aims to revive the art of public discourse across difference. It will do so by helping UW students develop their capacity to connect and disagree in ways that are both personally and civically constructive. The premise is that authentic, compassionate connection across difference is essential to our ongoing pursuit of justice and liberty for all.

For questions, please email engage.

To visit our website and apply, please go to www.uw.edu/carlson/dialogue.

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ENV H 446/546 Hazardous Waste and Public Health

ENV H 446 / 546 Hazardous Waste and Public Health

ENVH_446_546_WIN19_flyer.pdf

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REVISED: Winter Quarter Undergraduate Course: Global Health and Justice

The following class is now twice-a-week 50 minute interactive lectures and a 50 minute discussion sectiontiba.

Law 305 spring 2017

Global Health and Justice

Instructor: Beth E. Rivin, M.D., M.P.H.

This newly revised undergraduate course explores leading issues in global health and the human right to health. Specifically it focuses on injustices that occur around the world resulting in disease, disability and death. Using a justice framework, the course will consider social determinants of health and vulnerabilities that exist among populations and sub-populations, such as women, children, people with disabilities or HIV and the poor. Special attention will be given to low and middle income country health problems and struggles to attain healthy populations. Students will learn about the Sustainable Development Goals, international human rights law, and the pivotal role that law and ethics play in understanding and addressing injustices in health.

2019 GH 305 Course Flyer_.pdf

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Friday Harbor Labs info session Thursday, Nov 8 3:30 PM, FSH213

Friday Harbor Labs Info Session

Thursday, November 8, 2018

3:30 – 4:20 PM

Fishery Sciences Building (FSH) 213

Join Professor Megan Dethier (FHL Associate Director and instructor for the Marine Zoology/Botany Program) and Marine Biology Academic Adviser Joe Kobayashi for an information session about spring 2019 undergraduate courses at Friday Harbor Labs on San Juan Island. Plan now for spring quarter with information about FHL classes, research options, application, accommodations, and financial aid. Light refreshments are provided, and an RVSP is requested.

Info Session RSVP

Studying at Friday Harbor Labs

Study and live full-time at FHL for the entire spring quarter. Be a part of a small community of students, scientists and faculty, and live in dorms steps away from the shore. Get valuable experience working in the lab and field, exploring marine life in a variety of environments. Read more at fhl.uw.edu.

lIQ_zTOZp5l9WZIdQBvRA51O-lHvAYrwjNRj-oKDVRaeURzZtIXQQZbSZl_g12siqVLMGcb8DparGbOXV5eHJOmP1wnnAl0hXripYYn0voDdr1lRsa6v1x5NFpTxXpySFHODh-HH

Spring quarter undergraduate courses

Spring Marine Sciences

Undergraduate students from all backgrounds (science and non-science majors) explore the marine environment by building a full schedule from a selection of 5 courses: Marine Biology, Marine Mammals of the Salish Sea, Integrative Oceans, Science Writing for Diverse Audiences, and Marine Sciences Seminar.

Spring Marine Sciences Details

Marine Zoology/Botany (Zoo-Bot) Program

Juniors and seniors majoring or minoring in natural science register for an integrated schedule of three courses: Marine Zoology, Marine Botany, and Research in Marine Biology (with the option to add the Seminar). The research course guides students in developing their own research projects over the course of a quarter.

Zoo-Bot Details

UW Friday Harbor Laboratories: There’s a Place for You Here: https://youtu.be/_ZqX2GRDO6M

2019SpringMBQ.pdf

2019SpringZBQ.pdf

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Alternative Spring Break Opportunities for Students

ALTERNATIVE SPRING BREAK APPLICATIONS ARE OPEN!

Want to do something meaningful with your Spring Break? Spend yours providing mentorship and education at K-12 schools around Washington state! During Alternative Spring Break (ASB), you will learn from rural and tribal communities, team-teach, and grow.

ASB programs cultivate self-esteem and academic engagement among K-12 students, as well as expanding their sense of possibility for life after high school. UW students will find they have much to offer the program, and that they will gain a lot from the experience in return!

LITERACY ARTS ASB

Through Literacy Arts ASB, UW students have the opportunity to empower elementary school students in rural and tribal areas of Washington by helping them write and publish their own stories in a book. At the end of the week, these young students present their stories to the community. UW students have the rare opportunity to learn about life in a small community, forming impactful relationships.

Applications are open October 16th – November 16th.

LA ASB Info | Apply Now

STEM ASB + CASE ASB

Students engage high schoolers in engineering design, genetics, soil science, and planetary knowledge. Join us to inspire the leadership, learning capacities, and interest in science among youth of the Yakama Nation and Yakima Valley!

Additionally, check out our program Culture and Science Exchange (CASE), which, in addition to ASB, provides a 2-quarter (Winter/Spring) class with extended outreach opportunities. You can expect to gain valuable experience as an educator and a person.

Priority Deadline I: 11:59 PM, October 31st

Priority Deadline II: 11:59 PM, November 14th

STEM ASB Info | CASE ASB Info | Apply now!

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION ASB

EASB provides the unique opportunity for UW students to create their own curriculum related to Environmental/ Earth and Space Science in partnership with NASA during winter quarter. In addition to teaching, EASB emphasizes the importance of deepening community relationships across Washington. Questions can be directed to easb.facilitators.

Priority Deadline I: 11:59 PM, October 31st

Priority Deadline II: 11:59 PM, November 14th

EASB Info | New Participant Application | Returning Participant Application

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